first draft

First Draft: Forming the Idea

So, you have an idea that you think you can turn into a full story? Firstly, congratulations. Secondly, I hope you’re ready for hardwork.

Writing a book isn’t easy, and it shouldn’t be if you strive for perfection. However, having an idea that you feel you can see through to completion is the first step.

I’m a pantser, and that means I do not have a detailed plot before I sit down to write. I write by the seat of my pants. I let my ideas come organically as the words flow and I get to know my characters. However, when I first get an idea, I do let it roll around in my head for a good few months, gathering more possible narrative ideas, character voices etc. I think of it as a snowball getting bigger and bigger as it rolls around and more snow sticks to it.

Whether you are a pantser or a plotter, I highly recommend you do this with your idea – before anything gets to paper, before you start to outline, or crack on with your first page – be well acquainted.

Once I’m at this point, I crack out a notebook and write down everything and anything. My brainstorm over the last couple of months gets emptied onto paper. Every last bit, whether it is makes sense or not. If I like it, if I think it might work, I’ll write it down. It all gets dumped in my notebook for later use.

Once again, I feel this is good practise for plotters and pantsers. Your notes don’t have to be perfect, you don’t have to use 99% of them, but it is worth having them written down physically in the long run.

I feel this is the initial process of forming the idea. The idea is a spark that needs to be fanned to turn into a flame. At this stage, you can plot and outline further, or like me, sit down and start typing, but as long as you have fanned that spark a little, your flame will keep burning.


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first draft

New Blog Series

It’s new blog series time! Let me tell you a little more about what I have in store…

The series is called First Draft because each week I will focus on a different topic to do with writing the first draft. This is the series idea that was chosen by my readers as one they wanted to see on Writerly Bookish Stuff.

I have chosen my topics and scheduled them, ready for kick off on July 17th!

July 17th: Forming the Idea

July 24th: Naming Characters

July 31st: Point of View

August 7th: World Building

August 14th: Crafting Protagonists

August 21st: Crafting Antagonists

August 28th: Character Development

September 4th: Beating Procrastination

September 11th: The Ending

September 17th: Leave it Be

I hope that discussing these topics will be of help to some. I am working from my own drafting experience, so please understand that your process may be different to mine, but I will try to cover most bases, and hopefully, there may be some tips that you can take away from each instalment.


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Sharing Sundays

Sharing Sundays

This week, I’m bringing a Youtuber to your attention. Emily Bourne has a channel on Youtube where she discusses everything writerly.

Here’s a look at one of her videos: What is Writer’s Block?

Her videos are fun and informative for budding writers, so head over and let her know I sent you her way.


Do you have/know of any blogs, vlogs, or social media pages you think I’d be interested in? Let me know.


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

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Weekly Quotes

Writerly Wisdom

Writerly Wisdom

Honestly, I think there’s a cycle to the popularity of fantasy and fairytales that usually coincides with times of unrest or hardship in our own world. By retelling these legends or immersing ourselves in fantasy realms, we can safely explore the very real, very day-to-day darkness of our own lives.

– Sarah.J.Maas


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Weekly Quotes

Writerly Wisdom

Writerly Wisdom

All I can guess is that when I write, I forget that it’s not real. I’m living the story, and I think people can read that sincerity about the characters. They are real to me while I’m writing them, and I think that makes them real to the readers as well.”

– Stephenie Meyer


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