first draft

First Draft: The Ending

This post has been on the back burner a long while. I actually wrote tips for a satisfying ending when I did the vote to ask my readers what series they’d like to see on Writerly Bookish Stuff. When the First Draft idea came out on top, I put it on the aside to include in the series… finally, here it is.

Tie Up Loose Ends

There needs to be some sort of conclusion to the conflicts that presented themselves during the narrative. Unresolved conflicts is highly unsatisfying for the reader.

Believability

The ending has to arrive naturally as a result of the story arc. You must not force the ending you want on your narrative or you will have unsatisfied readers.

Cliffhanger After Conclusion

A cliffhanger is not a conclusion. A cliffhanger is another story spur that carries the reader further on with the narrative i.e. into the next book. It cannot take the place of concluding certain conflicts to the story so far, even if the main arc is still ongoing.

Know When to Stop

This can be tough. Knowing when to start the beginning of the end is ultimately a gut instinct. Be aware if starting new conflicts that you have time to resolve them or if they can be part of the longer arc into subsequent books.


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First Draft: Character Development

I was looking forward to writing this post as character development is one of my favourite things about writing. I also enjoy reading well rounded characters who go on a journey, not just physically but emotionally.

Today, I am going to share my top 5 tips for character development:

Details and Actions

The reader needs to know and understand your character. I don’t recommend info dumps of description etc, but drip feeding little nuggets about your character throughout the narrative works perfectly. Showing your character’s personality by actions rather than telling is more organic for the reader.

Become One with Your Character

You need to get in your character’s head. If you know them inside and out and understand how they would act, then this will translate to the reader.

Don’t leave any stone unturned when it comes to knowing your character. Even if you don’t include every aspect of their life, just knowing it will aid your writing.

Find their Voice

This is more than simply writing dialogue and giving them an accent. Voice can be a distinctive part of the character’s story. Do they swear a lot? Are they sarcastic? Perhaps their lack of filter gets them in hot water time and time again. Defining their voice is important in making them memorable, and voice can be so distinctive that it actually aids or hinders the narrative.

Actions and Consequences

This is an important point to cover to show the progression of your character over the course of the narrative.

How have the things they have been through affected their outlook or how they react? Would they react differently to a certain situation at the end of the book than they would at the beginning? This development should be at the forefront of your mind as you progress with your character’s story arc.

Internal Conflict

No one is perfect, so why would your character be? Internal conflicts such as anxiety or resentment can be used to drive/ influence the narrative. Overcoming an internal conflict is a great character arc and shows progression and growth.


Do you have any tips for character development and writing memorable characters?


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100% K.J Chapman

Writing Hiatus

I have decided to take a writing hiatus until September. After managing 5k during CampNaNo, I haven’t been able to get anything written and I’ve been feeling this constant, nagging guilt like I should be doing something else.

My daughter is off school for the holidays, and with family taking precedent, I am allowing myself to put Zombies and Budgie Smugglers aside until she is back to school.

I may get some handwritten bits and bobs down, but I have taken the pressure off myself for the month. No more writing guilt!

However, the blog posts will continue. Next week, is episode 5 of my First Draft series and it is all about crafting protagonists. Teaser Tueaday will be put on the back burner until September as no writing means no teasers. I am currently, thinking up a post to replace it.


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First Draft: World Building

Where your story takes place is just as important as every other aspect of story telling. Creating a well rounded world helps your reader visualise the story better and it adds another level – hidden depth – to your story.

World building is a lot more than just describing the setting. Here are my tips on what to think about for successful world building:

Landscape

Is your story set on Earth, in space, or a fictional, fantasy world with two suns and a red sky? The reader wants to feel immersed and be able to visual your world.

Laws / Magic Systems

This can include the basic authority hierarchy as in a government system, or the laws of magic and wizardry. You set the limits in your world, and setting limits is extremely important.

For example, JK. Rowling had a wizarding government that created and executed laws so she could keep the use of magic within a realistic, manageable realm with actions and consequences.

Religion

Does religion factor in your story? Do you need to create a new religion for your fictional world? It is always a good idea to think about this, even if you don’t think religion plays a role in your narrative. It may affect other characters or play into the historical side to your world.

History

Is there folk lore or myth in your narrative that dates back in your world’s history? Was there a tyrant King that changed the economy for the worse, or a heroine Queen who saved the people from a dictatorship? Backstory is an important factor in a believable, well rounded world.

Era

Era is more than just stating what decade or century your tale is set in. It is about staying true to the time period in regards to technology, etiquette, and society etc.

Language

A lot of authors struggle when it comes to language, especially if they have to make up a whole new tongue. Knowing your language helps you weave it effortlessly through your narrative without it becoming jarring for the reader.

This topic also follows on from the point above- era. Knowing your era and the language used helps with consistency and realism.


I hope these points have given you some food for thought. As you can tell, they all link into each other, and that is exactly what you want in your world: consistency continuity, and believability.


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Teaser Tuesday

Teaser Tuesday

CampNaNo ends in tomorrow, and I have resigned myself to the fact that I won’t reach my target of 9k. However, I’ve written 5k this month so far. I will probably squeeze a couple hundred more in today, but I am okay will the progress I have made this month.

Here is a teaser from one of my latest writing sessions:


Join me tomorrow for a post all about POV.


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Teaser Tuesday

Teaser Tuesday

I totally see light at the end of the drafting tunnel now. I may be behind with CampNaNo, but I do think I’m getting somewhere.

I am considering doing my cover and blurb reveal soon.

Until then, here’s another teaser:


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Teaser Tuesday

Teaser Tuesday

I’m well into the swing of CampNaNo now. I feel like the end is in sight for this novella. Well, the end of the first draft anyway.

I’ve written a lot of relationship dynamics this week, and that’s where I shine (if I do say so myself). Here’s a teaser for you:


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