Book Reviews

Book Review: Kindle Income by Alex Foster

Kindle Income by Alex Foster 2.5/5


This book covers the fundamentals to making a living writing books for Kindle. How to set up your book from cover to description to maximize sales.
How to get motivated and pick which books to write. A beginner’s guide to starting with Kindle with the intent to profit. How to gather a following and write quickly to publish books faster.

Review:

I have to review this book from two view points. Firstly, the book didn’t offer me anything I didn’t already know, but would probably help out a new writer with zero knowledge of self publishing.

Secondly, I have read a good few of the books this author has released, and the information is recycled somewhat from book to book. All that seems different is the titles.

These books are not helpful for writers with a general knowledge of self publishing, and the content isn’t much varied, but on the other hand, newbies might benefit from them.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

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Book Reviews

Book Review: How to Make Money Blogging by Bob Lotich

How to Make Money Blogging by Bob Lotich 3/5

Bob Lotich founded ChristianPF.com back in 2007 and after getting laid off in 2008 he took the leap into full-time blogging. Less than a year later he was earning more from his blog than his previous day-job.
While his results are not typical, this book covers all the steps he took to make money from his blog over that two-year period.

Review:

There isn’t anything wrong with this book, it just didn’t offer me anything personally. It covers the basics thoroughly, so if you don’t know the basics, then this is great. I know the basics, and although I blog as a platform for my books and to review, rather than to make my blog my business, I was hoping for some new, innovative ways to grow, even if just a tad.

Basically, time and hard work grows a blog, and eventually, can lead to income, but I’m already aware of that.

However, like I said, this is a good freebie for beginners.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: Duplicate by Phoenix Ward

Duplicate by Phoenix Ward 3/5

Upon death, the neurological data that composes one’s personality is downloaded and installed onto computers in the next evolution of A.I.s. These programs are known as installed intelligences, or I.I.s, and they are the secret to human immortality. In recent years, the installation process has opened up for the wealthy public as a means to keep family members alive after their body has died.

Review:

The premise is intriguing and drew me in. The idea of the immortal soul is not a new concept, but mix it with science and tech and you have a fascinating story. The ethics and legal barriers to such a practice could be explored more in a longer novella or novel.

Although intriguing, I could have done with a little more explanation. Short stories don’t lend themselves well to in-depth back stories or info dumps, and that’s why I think this story would work well as a longer story.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties
All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman
K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

ARC Review: Taste the Dark by Nicola Rose

Taste the Dark by Nicola Rose 4/5

39317106Jess

I killed my parents. I didn’t mean to, I don’t think. I can’t really remember.

I can’t remember much from the years that followed either, other than an endless stream of bad decisions, generally involving alcohol, drugs and bad boys. My new job in a new town signified a turning point – time to sort myself out.

What I hadn’t anticipated was the 6ft package of brooding, inked-up perfection who started stalking me. And don’t even mention the equally hot brother crawling under my skin…

They radiate danger, it flows around them like a seductive spell; and danger is my favourite word.

Zac

I was doing a pretty good job at balancing on the fine line between light and dark, blurring the edges and living in the grey. But then dead vampires started piling up around me and the Bael gave me a ticking countdown to fix it.

Now she’s arrived. Four seconds – the moment I saw her – that’s how long it took to know that she’d simultaneously bring heaven and hell to my door. I don’t even know what she is, but I know I crave her.

Falling for a human girl has left me teetering on the verge of collapse. This could be just the ammo my brother needs to nudge me over the edge and into oblivion.

Taste the Dark is out 30-4-18! Preorder your copy here.

Review:

After reading Rose’s novella, Breaking the Gladiator, I had no fears about my liking this novel. The effortless writing style, steamy and dark scenes, and captivating narrative made this book a quick, enthralling read. The paranormal elements were handled with the right dose of darkness and believability.  Vampires have been overdone on the indie scene of late, but a fresh, exciting take on the mythical creatures is always a great find.

I can’t say I particularly liked Jess’ character at first, but her extroverted ways complimented the narrative and made her choices believeable. The love triangle was intriguing for sure. There is a Vampire Diaries vibe to this aspect of the story. It was a case of how dark is too dark in your chosen love interest. Well, I know whose team I’m on.

This is a lengthy read and a little slow moving, but the story is just as important as the romance.

Book two is out soon, so there is no need to twiddle our thumbs waiting for more from Jess and Zac.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

ARC Review: Raven’s Cry by Dana Fraedrich

Raven’s Cry by Dana Fraedrich 4.5/5

38323190.jpgA dark retelling of Swan Lake ~ Calandra is happiest when she’s surrounded by quiet, joined only by a book and a cup of tea, never around people and their insufferable need to make small talk. When Nicodemus, a magus with immense power, joins the royal court of Invarnis, Calandra’s life will change forever. As a terrible curse pursues her through the centuries, Calandra will have to overcome captivity, war, and loss.

In this standalone installment, set in Dana Fraedrich’s Broken Gears universe, readers will join Calandra in her battle for freedom, hope, and healing.

Raven’s Cry is out 1-5-18 !!!! Preorder your copy here.

Review:

After reading Fraedrich’s Out of the Shadows, I was keen for an ARC of Raven’s Cry. I haven’t yet read book two in the Broken Gears series, but it was easy to jump back in with this book as it is a standalone, yet still has links to Out of the Shadows for those who have read it. Don’t worry if you haven’t read the rest of the series, it won’t affect the narrative for you. Those links are only noticeable to readers of the other books.

The world building in Cali’s tale is just as thought out and imaginative. Cali’s story is tragic for centuries, but she somehow keeps her head and makes it through the torture and imprisonment at the hands of a powerful, evil magus.

Fraedrich has mastered the retelling well. I am not usually a fan of retellings, but as long as the narrative carries its weight in its own right with hints to the original, then I am a happy reader.

If you enjoy retellings, this dark retelling of Swan Lake is for you, and while you’re at it, why not get book one in the Broken Gears series?


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: Turning Grace by J.Q. Davis

book review

Turning Grace by J.Q. Davis 3/5
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Life or death?
It all seems to be the same for Grace…

Some of us have been there before — falling for the hot, popular jock who just so happens to be dating the hot, popular girl in school.

Your snarky-but-always-right bestie insists you make a move, but you’re not so much into putting yourself out there.

Then it happens, and suddenly you find yourself eating a cat on your neighbor’s porch.

No? Never happened to you?

Well, Grace Watkins can’t say the same. Her hunger is growing with each day that passes and her urges are getting harder to control.
No one can explain why her body is changing, except one man.

Review:

A zombie book that follows a teen injected with a untested serum as a child and the deterioration of her body and mind ever since.

It’s unusual to find a zombie book that doesn’t have an ‘outbreak’ or a virus that can be passed on through a bite. It was interesting to see the methods Davis thought up for Grace’s mother to use in order to maintain her daughter’s ignorance to what she truly was, and the repercussions of not explaining the situation to Grace when things start going severely south.

Some niggles I had were Grace’s naivety and Tristan’s utter acceptance. Insta-love is a well used trope in some YA stories, and maybe teens will find this book and the relationship dynamics more believable.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: 1984 by George Orwell

book review

1984 by George Orwell 3/5
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Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell’s nightmare vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff’s attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of the novel is Orwell’s prescience of modern life–the ubiquity of television, the distortion of the language–and his ability to construct such a thorough version of hell. Required reading for students since it was published, it ranks among the most terrifying novels ever written.

Review:

I’ve been meaning to read 1984 for a while. Of course, I knew of the concept (who doesn’t?), but there’s nothing like reading it for yourself. This review will probably sound cliche, but hey, I agree with the general concensus: ahead of its time, transcends generations, and is scarily familiar in 2018. That doesn’t mean I was overly enthralled in the narrative, more in awe of Orwell’s foresight.

This is a book that has a permanent place on the dystopian shelf as a founder and fore-runner in the genre. Orwell’s imagination is expansive and convincing.

“War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.”

How chilling is that?


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: Crescent Moon by James Fahy

book review

Crescent Moon (Phoebe Harkness #2) by James Fahy 5/5

30628688What do you do when your world is turned upside down? When you discover your father had a direct hand in the genocide of much of the world’s human population?

Phoebe Harkness’ life has changed forever. Thirty years after a cataclysmic world war that eviscerated one third of the human population, a new sub-species of vampire-like drones has set its teeth to the survivors of humanity. They’re not the only ones: ‘Genetic Others’ such as vampires, werewolves and more roam the streets of New Oxford, trying – and sometimes failing – to live peacefully amongst humankind.

But that is all about to change.

A spate of serial killings have occurred, rocking the already fragile ecosystem of New Oxford. Brutal murders and mutilation are now commonplace.

Phoebe must get to work. She is named as liaison between the Genetic Others and the Cabal, the ruling order of the walled city. She must negotiate with the Tribals, a subset of werewolves cast aside by the cultural hegemony of the Cabal. But before she can make any progress with the Tribal leader, Kane, she learns of more murders – and three missing students. And Kane’s daughter is among the missing…

One of the victims leaves a message in blood: ‘Crescent Moon’.

Now Phoebe must act urgently with the help of Kane and her former paramour, vampire Allesandro to track down the culprit of these horrific killings. But who is conducting all of these strange happenings behind the scenes? And what does it have to do with the Crescent Moon…?

Review:

Now, I have some decisions to make. Whose team am I on? After book one, I declared I was a Helsing, but what is the equivalent for Tribals? Alessandro or Kane, hmmmm? Do I even have to choose.

Okay, back to the review.

Crescent Moon certainly lived up to Hell’s Teeth. The characters and relationships that were already established in book one, grow in depth in book two. The introduction of Kane and the Tribals offered a whole other dynamic to Phoebe’s world in New Oxford.

Phoebe is still out of her depth and thrust into life threatening situations by Cabal despite her ‘condition’ that is growing worse by the day. I’m glad to see she still has her sense of humour. My new favourite character is Chase Pargate. I loved his distinctive voice. Finding out who he was/ how he was kept the pages turning. In fact, all the subplots and back story are excellently woven into the main narrative to keep us guessing until the end.

As many questions are posed as are answered. I shall just sit here eagerly awaiting book three.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: Invasion by Sean Platt & Johnny B Truant

book review

Invasion by Sean Platt & Johnny B Truant 3/5

24915344They are coming. The countdown has begun.
First visible only as blips on a telescope image, the discovery of objects approaching from Jupiter orbit immediately sets humanity on edge. NASA doesn’t even bother to deny the alien ships’ existence. The popular Astral space app (broadcasting from the far side of the moon and accessible by anyone with internet) has already shown the populace what is coming. So the news has turned from evasion to triage, urging calm and offering the few facts they have:

The objects are enormous, perfectly round spheres numbering in the dozens, maybe hundreds. They are on an approach vector for Earth. And they will arrive in six days.

Fear simmers.
Meyer Dempsey – mogul, wealthy entrepreneur, arrogant and always in charge – is in New York, on the phone with his ex-wife in LA when the news breaks. He can hear tension in the voices of reporters and experts chronicling all that’s known and unknown. But even while those supposedly in charge restrain their own panic, Meyer finds he recognizes bits and pieces of what the world is facing. He’s seen this in dreams – in visions of another place. He knows where he and his family must go. He has prepared … though he never knew until now what he’d been preparing for.

He knows only they cannot hesitate. They must run to their safe haven in the Colorado mountains. Now. Before society shatters into chaos, and it all falls apart.

Review:

There’s not a lot of ‘invasion’ in this book. The story follows Meyer Dempsey as he takes his family across country to get them to a safe haven after the first initial sightings of ‘crafts’ approaching Earth from Jupiter’s orbit. This book is part of a series, so the invasion/ contact should occur later on in the series. Perhaps book one should have been called ‘Sighting’???

The characters are well developed and stick to their character arcs, but they’re not particularly likeable. This did hinder my reading experience because even the characters you’re supposed to like/ feel sorry for, I.E. Piper, come across as naive or plain ignorant in places.

The story is well written and I couldn’t distinguish between the two authors. Their writing styles obviously not only compliment each other, but blend incredibly well.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

 

Book Reviews, Books and Me

ARC Review: Carl by Brianna West

book review

Carl (Guardians in Love #4) by Brianna West 5/5

28280106_226883474546089_5362592180987135567_n.jpgCarl, twin of Bernie and respected Promiscus Guardian on Lucas’ notorious team, has spent over a decade in love with a man who will never return his affections. Heartbroken from his unrequited love, he assists another team in an effort to get away. However, an unexpected development with two of the Guardians leads to a love triangle he isn’t equipped to deal with. And when a Guardian he thought dead appears, Carl is dragged into a world of trouble.

Can he figure out the reason for the sudden appearance of an old companion while combatting the affections of two men? Or will the pressure be too much for him and force him to flee?

Can Carl truly love with his heart completely torn to pieces? Or will the risk of another heartbreak make it not a risk worth taking?

Review:

This is possibly the longest I have had to wait for a new release from West, but it was totally worth it. I was excited to hear that this love story would be Carl’s. Level-headed, reliable Carl. Seriously, Carl needed someone special in his life.

This is West’s first same sex relationship story. I was expecting it, as although Carl’s preference wasn’t really discussed in the Promiscus Guardians series, it was kind of obvious who he had the hots for. This spin-off was definitely another steamy hit from West.

Carl’s character development was well rounded and continued from what we knew of him in the Promiscus Guardians Series. It was great to see him come out of his shell and garner a different outlook on love. The love triangle was complicated, and put Carl totally out of his comfort zone, but without it, I doubt he’d have discovered his true feelings toward a certain someone.

The storyline focussed not only on the love triangle, but on a person from his past, and Carl’s need to help them back to the Light. The history of that relationship clearly had a profound effect on him, and mixing that with the new relationships added a depth to Carl’s story, fears, and decisions. As a reader I felt satisfied with Carl’s conclusion and growth as a character.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review