Review: Stig of the Dump by Clive King

book review

Stig of the Dump by Clive Owens 4.5/5

979470.jpgBarney is a solitary eight-year-old, given to wandering off by himself. One day he tumbles over, lands in a sort of cave, and meets’ somebody with shaggy hair wearing a rabbit-skin and speaking in grunts. He names him Stig. They together raid the rubbish dump at the bottom of the pit, improve Stig’s cave dwelling, and enjoy a series of adventures.

 

Review:

Another re-read of one of my childhood favourites has only reaffirmed my love for this book. I can recall reading Stig of the Dump to myself for the first time at about eight years old, and then having my teacher read it during storytime just a few months later. I was still as impressed with the story as I read it to my daughter.

Why did I give it 4.5 and not 5*? Purely for the fact that my daughter didn’t seem to enjoy it as much as our last read, The Borrowers. Her attention wandered a little during the lengthier descriptions. I, on the other hand, loved the detailed descriptions and wonderful relationship dynamic between Barney and Stig. I will encourage my daughter to re-read the book for herself in a year or two.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

 

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Review: When Stars Burn Out by Anna Vera

book review

When Stars Burn Out by Anna Vera 4.5/5

34503277When a plague turns people into monsters, the only safe place left to live is the Ora, a spaceship beside Earth’s moon. Aboard are the specimens of the next generation, genetically modified to develop powerful abilities, which they must use to fulfill their life’s purpose: exterminating those infected by the plague and stopping the apocalypse.

From the day Eos Europa was created eighteen years ago, she’s cared about little else. But when she fails to develop an ability, everything she’s worked for is lost—that is, until soldiers start disappearing only seconds after reaching Earth’s surface.

In an act of desperation, Eos is sent to Earth to find the missing soldiers. But what she discovers challenges everything she’s ever been taught—about who she is, where she’s come from, and how the apocalypse really began—leaving her to decide whether she’ll continue to play the puppet she was created to be, or disappear like everyone else.

Review:

When Stars Burn Out is a mix of The 100 and Divergent, teamed with a unique twist on the zombie apocalypse narrative. There were many plot twists thrown in along the way, and I could not predict where Vera was going to take the story. Book two is high on my to be read pile, but it’s not published yet. Ahhhh! #thestruggleisreal.

I enjoy a well-written, inventive take on YA literature. This story is highly character driven, just how I like it. You are not only drawn into Eos’ story, but that of all the sub-characters. Everyone has a past, everyone has their own reasoning, and everyone adds to the story in their own way. The character development is well rounded and thought out.

I also enjoyed the romantic element. More so because it wasnt the driving force of the narrative and didn’t sway Eos or change her values. That ending, though. I need answers to heal my cracking heart.

My only niggle was the pacing at the very end. A lot happens in the space of two chapters. There is a time jump of a week, Eos is not sure what has happened in that time, and then there’s some more big revelations. However, I am eager to find out more in the sequel.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: The Girl with the Green-Tinted Hair by Gavin Whyte

book review

The Girl with the Green-Tinted Hair by Gavin Whyte 3/5

27419129When a boy finds a girl singing and dancing under his favourite tree he didn’t realise he had been chosen to be the one-off witness to something out of this world. The boy is shown how to live in joy and is reminded of how to pursue his life’s calling. His fear of ageing is overcome and dying is no longer what it seems – all because of the girl with the green-tinted hair.

In this truly comforting tale of wonder and intrigue, which has been called a “hidden gem”, we discover for ourselves how to live in harmony with that which is forever flowing; that which we call life.

Review:

I have mixed feelings about this book. The messages and life lessons the boy learns are important, but this was a non-story in regards to narrative. Yes, I suppose the narrative is the passing of time, growth, and learning, but that was it. Simply put, not my cup of tea. I also didn’t like the narrators voice. The fable vibe was strong, and I have a preference for updating and modernising such types of tales. Younger people may have a totally different view of this book than me.

I cannot fault the writing. The author has a clear, easy to read style.

I have read differing reviews. It’s clear that age and genre preference play a huge factor. I reckon this is a ‘marmite’ kind of story.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: The Alpha Plague by Michael Robertson

book-review

The Alpha Plague by Michael Robertson 4/5

25815168Rhys is an average guy who works an average job in Summit City—a purpose built government complex on the outskirts of London.

The Alpha Tower stands in the centre of the city. An enigma, nobody knows what happens behind its dark glass.

Rhys is about to find out.

At ground zero and with chaos spilling out into the street, Rhys has the slightest of head starts. If he can remain ahead of the pandemonium, then maybe he can get to his loved ones before the plague does.

Review:

I can’t say that this isn’t your typical zombie/ infection novel, but I can say that the writing was good, the narrative was believable, and the action was intense. Sometimes, we just need a little of what we know done well. The Alpha Plague was that for me.

Rhy’s motivation throughout is to get to his son. I can understand that Vicky’s participation in getting him off the island stems from guilt, but the way their relationship grows in a few hours felt a little forced. I did enjoy how they bounced off of each other, each with their own personality traits and opinions which aided in keeping them both alive.

The storyline behind the ‘release’ of the infection is well believable in this day and age. Biological warfare gone wrong is a scary thought, especially if the enemy know what you are doing and how to use it to their advantage. I hope to hear a little more about The East and what they gained from their actions in the sequel.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: Winter by Marissa Meyer

book-review

Winter by Marissa Meyer 4/5

13206900Princess Winter is admired by the Lunar people for her grace and kindness, and despite the scars that mark her face, her beauty is said to be even more breathtaking than that of her stepmother, Queen Levana.

Winter despises her stepmother, and knows Levana won’t approve of her feelings for her childhood friend–the handsome palace guard, Jacin. But Winter isn’t as weak as Levana believes her to be and she’s been undermining her stepmother’s wishes for years. Together with the cyborg mechanic, Cinder, and her allies, Winter might even have the power to launch a revolution and win a war that’s been raging for far too long.

Review:

I am a huge fan of Cinder, Scarlet, and Cress. Winter, however, took a little longer to get into. I think it was about chapter fifteen where I found my foothold in the story, picked up pace, and couldn’t put it down.

The fairytale retelling is a Meyer masterpiece yet again. I usually detest retellings, but I LOVE The Lunar Chronicles. The loved, kind-hearted Princess ruled over by her villainous step-mother storyline is executed in a fresh, original way, and blends beautifully with the rest of the series.

I’m still a Wolf girl. Scarlet and Wolf’s reunion was just ahhhhh. I won’t say anymore. The characters have their flaws, but you can’t help but get swept up in the camaraderie. Their personality traits work well together, and the narrative/ character development progressed naturally and truthfully.

The ending was exactly what I wanted for my favourite team of buddies. If you like fairytale retellings, why not try this sci-fi series with a hint of romance? It is unputdownable.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

My 2018 Reading Plans

book review(3)

I’ve decided that 2018 will be a mostly ebook year. Why? Because of the sheer amount of ebooks on my Kindle. So many good ebooks on there are being neglected. That’s not to say I won’t read paperbacks as I have many from 2017 to finish, but I’m going to ‘try’ to avoid borrowing from the library, ‘try’ not to buy any new paperbacks unless I have been anticipating them for ages, and ‘try’ not to buy any more ebooks until the ones I have are read.

Due to a hectic year ahead, I’ve cut my Goodreads reading challenge target from 80 books in 2017 to 40 books in 2018. If I can do more, then great!

What goodies are waiting for me on my Kindle?…

My 2018 Ebook TBR Pile.png

Have you changed your reading habits for 2018? Do you have a Goodreads reading challenge target, and what are your plans to smash it?


Content belongs to K.J. Chapman

Review: The Sheep Pig by Dick King Smith

book-review

The Sheep Pig by Dick King Smith 4/5

6tag_221217-135642When Babe arrives at Hogget Farm, Mrs. Hogget’s thoughts turn to sizzling bacon and juicy pork chops–until he reveals a surprising talent for sheepherding, that is. Before long, Babe is handling Farmer Hogget’s flock better than any sheepdog ever could. Babe is so good, in fact, that the farmer enters him into the Grand Challenge Sheepdog Trials. Will it take a miracle for Babe to win?

Review:

One of the joys of having children is re-reading your old favourites to them. My daughter’s copy of The Sheep Pig is, in fact, my copy from childhood.

Re-reading as an adult helps you see the themes and morals in the story that you may have missed as a child. The underlying theme of this book is that you can be anything you want to be and do anything you want to do if you set your mind to it. Also, manners go a long way. Babe wanted to work sheep, so he learnt , listened, and worked hard. He also treated the sheep as his equals. This is an important message for impressionable, young minds.

There are a few truthful, raw moments dotted in the otherwise joyous narrative. When Ma died, my daughter broke her heart, and straight after, Babe was seconds from being executed. I forgot how the narrative went a little dark in that moment, and although upset, my daughter wanted me to continue. Life and death are fairly common themes in children’s literature now, and The Sheep Pig handles the truth of farm life brilliantly. We are not a family of vegetarians, and reminding my daughter of this helped her see the truth in where her food actually comes from and what happens from farm to plate.

In summary, a quick re-read that touched on some important issues.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

EVO Ghost Release Day News

book-review13

I am thrilled to announce that EVO Ghost has an official release date…

March 1st 2018

preorder from amazon.png

This also means that you can preorder your copy from Amazon: preorder link. However, I will be doing an ARC reviewer call out in the New Year.

In the meantime, get EVO Ghost on your Goodreads want to read lists: EVO Ghost on Goodreads.


Content belongs to K.J. Chapman

Crimbo Book Shout Out #3

Copy of book review

Have you been waiting patiently for the final Crimbo book shout out and giveaway? Of course you have! The winner of last week’s Cass Michaels giveaway was Laura Carter. Congratulations!


This week’s Crimbo book shout out is for a Christmas horror book, Merry Murder by Angel Gelique…

33555243Poor Paul McKenna. He just wants to enjoy the holidays. But with an obstinate teen-aged daughter, Heather, and an unreasonable wife who enables her, Paul is anything but jolly. Heather has her heart set on getting the latest cell phone for Christmas. The only problem is Paul can’t find one within the acceptable price range. He simply refuses to fall victim to holiday price-gouging. He has every intention of buying the phone weeks after Christmas when it’s half the price. Surely, Heather will understand…right?

In this tale of vengeance, a well-intentioned father will find that sometimes it’s better to appease an incorrigible teen daughter—no matter the cost—rather than incur her wrath.

Would you like a chance to win an e-copy of Merry Murder? All you have to do is share Angel Gelique’s Amazon page via any social media platform and paste a copy of the link to your post in the comments below to be entered. You can also enter by sharing the post from my Instagram feed. You can find more information here.

You can find Angel Gelique and her books here:

Amazon

Goodreads

Webpage


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

Review: The Unexpected Gift by Nicole Casey

book-review

The Unexpected Gift by Nicole Casey 3/5

6tag_111217-072240He’s a billionaire in Seattle. I’m practically a nun. Nothing is going to happen between us. Right?

I only return home from my missionary work in Moscow for one reason: collect the cash donation for the starving children from my wealthy brother, Matthew.

I didn’t expect to meet my brother’s best friend and business partner, Nick again.

He’s more mature now, with broad shoulders, perfect abs and a gorgeous face.

And when I get to know him more, I am surprised to find that I’m absurdly attracted to his attentiveness and generous heart.

Is falling for him the biggest mistake of my life?

And what if he finds out there is an unexpected gift for both of us for Christmas?

Review:

The Unexpected Gift is a quick read that can be finished in one sitting.

Eva’s character complemented Nick’s, so the natural chemistry and relationship development felt natural and believable. However, for a nun about to take her vows she was easily swayed… as in no resistance whatsoever. It was hardly a case of Nick having to put in any effort. I guess that whole element to the storyline felt a little contrived to me.

Despite him being a money-greedy jerk, her brother Matthew was an interesting character. I would have liked to have seen more of him in the narrative.

The mix of sad and happy moments throughout the short narrative appealed to me, but the ending didn’t quite cover it. I wanted to know a little more. I am assuming there is/ will be a sequel to this short story.


 

The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review