Review: Timewalker by Justin Stanchfield

book-review

Timewalker by Justin Stanchfield 3/5

6tag_140917-114552.jpgSean thinks he’s going crazy when a girl from his nightmares appears to him on a lonely road. But the deadly enemies that are chasing her across time and space are no dream-and they will stop at nothing to destroy the future of the human race.

Sean agrees to help the girl, but there’s something she is still hiding from him… The truth is, Sean is the only one who can save mankind. He just doesn’t know it yet.

Review:

I picked up this book from the sci-fi section in my library, but it would be more at home in the young adult section. Young teens would appreciate this book and relate to the young characters. The beginning is a little slow, but there is a definite Stranger Things vibe: teen brothers harbouring a strange girl with powers who appeared from nowhere.

Many questions arise throughout the narrative, and are all answered as you move forward. Some are predictable, some not so. I enjoyed learning more about Hamilton and his intentions, or rather the intentions of his ‘bosses’.

Some relationships felt a little forced to me. Sean admits to ‘falling’ after knowing Kyr for a few days. Seeing her in his nightmares isn’t quite the makings of love. However, the switch up in Kyr’s affections, and the relationship between the boys and their father, was well developed and believable. It held weight where everything else was spiralling into the unknown.

I’d recommend this to teen readers who enjoy all things science fiction.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Advertisements

August Reads Round Up

book-review1

Black-Eyed Devils by Catrin Collier

5528155Full Review: Black-Eyed Devils

I rate this book 5/5. Historical truths, teamed with believable characters and back story make for an interesting read. Everything is against Amy and Tom. He is a ‘Blackleg’ brought in by mine bosses to fill the jobs of the striking miners. Amy’s father and brother are striking miners. Need I say more?

A Shining in the Shadows by Beverley Lee

6tag_130817-200747Full Review: A Shining in the Shadows

I rate this book 5/5. A brilliant interpretation on the vampire genre. Effortless plot twists, relationship growth, and character development. Highly recommended, and I can’t wait for book three.

 

Never Too Late by Jane Laird

6tag_190817-073513Full Review: Never Too Late.

I rate this book 2/5. This readd is very short, and left little time for character development. The story is swett, but I found the ending forced.

 

Hellfire by Drew Avera

6tag_190817-073430Full Review: Hellfire.

I rate this book 4/5. This scifi, military tale drew me in and kept me enthralled. I would love to see this addaptedd into a full length novel. The ending was brilliant and unexpected.

 

I Still Love You by Jane Lark

6tag_190817-073804Full Review: I Still Love You.

I rate this book 2/5. The writing was fine, but the topic was far too depressing for my tastes. Don’t get me wrong, the topic is important to highlight, but this book was just not my cup of tea.

 

The God Machine by Mikey Campling, Drew Avera, Christopher Godsoe, and Jamie Dodge

6tag_190817-073558Full Review: The God Machine.

I rate this book 3/5. A unique concept that could easily be expanded. Considering this is the work of four authors, it didn’t jar with me, and the writing styles ran smoothly throughout.

We Have a Winner!!

Thank you to all who have taken part in my 400 followers giveaway. I am pleased to announce a winner of all four ebooks…

Congratulations

Congratulations, Jill Jemmett. Check your inbox! I hope you enjoy Teddie’s, Ezrahli’s, and Dagger’s stories.


Don’t worry if you missed out on the giveaway, you can find all my books on Amazon.


Content belongs to K.J. Chapman

Review: A Shining in the Shadows by Beverley Lee

book-review

A Shining in the Shadows (Gabriel Davenport #2) by Beverley Lee 5/5

6tag_130817-200747Gabriel Davenport has been remade from darkness. Now, he must adapt to survive .

In a small seaside town, Gabriel’s maker unwittingly takes his wards into the throes of a deadly new game. There are rumblings on The Bloodvyne, the mental web of linked vampire consciousness. Whispers about a cleansing, about the ruling council hunting vampires with impure blood.

Gabriel finds himself thrust into a new nightmare, where the hunter becomes the hunted. When his maker is taken, he must battle to untangle the mystifying clues laid out in an uncovered labyrinth to find the only creature strong enough to fight against those that hunt his new-found family.

Gaze long into the darkness, and you’ll find old vampire foes out for revenge, new ones with their own agenda, and a witch who holds the key. But just who is the monster in the middle?

Review:

Another masterpiece from Lee. After relishing Lee’s effortless writing style in book one, I was yet again sucked into Gabriel’s world and led like a sleepwalker through the pages and plot twists with ease. Lee makes writing seem easy. The pacing, narrative, and character development has a superb flow, and as a reader, you wake up at the end wondering where you are and how you got there. Book hangover!

Some points that I have to mention:

  1. The relationship dynamics are on fire. There are some curve balls, and then relationships that blossom organically, despite initial thoughts.
  2.  Plot twists are subtley woven into the narrative. The ending is a weaving together of story pieces. Writing tapestry.
  3. Character development is a huge part of my reading experience. When you’re rooting for anti-heroes of sorts, you know the writer has got it right.

In summary, this is a vampire read that isn’t cliche. The characters and relationships are well crafted, and the story is littered with breadcrumbs that tie up effortlessly at the end. I highly recommend this series.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: Stormdancer by Jay Kristoff

book-review

Stormdancer by Jay Kristoff 4/5

6tag_210717-204649Arashitoras are supposed to be extinct. So when Yukiko and her warrior father Masaru are sent to capture one for the Shõgun, they fear that their lives are over – everyone knows what happens to those who fail the Lord of the Shima Isles. But the mission proves less impossible and more deadly than anyone expects. Soon Yukiko finds herself stranded: a young woman alone in her country’s last wilderness, with only a furious, crippled arashitora for company. Although she can hear his thoughts, and saved his life, all she knows for certain is he’d rather see her dead than help her. Yet trapped together in the forest, Yukiko and the beast soon discover a bond that neither of them expected.

Meanwhile, the country around them verges on collapse. A toxic fuel is choking the land, the machine-powered Lotus Guild is publicly burning those they deem Impure, and the Shõgun cares for nothing but his own dominion. Authority has always made Yukiko, but her world changes when she meets Kin, a young man with secrets, and the rebel Kagé cabal. She learns the horrifying extent of the Shõgun’s crimes, both against her country and her family.

Returning to the city, Yukiko is determined to make the Shõgun pay – but what can one girl and a flightless arashitora do against the might of an empire?

Review:

I went into this book with an open mind. I had read 5*, glowing reviews, and 1*/2* slating ones. Most of the 1*/ 2* reviews are based on what the readers felt was a lack of thorough research into the Japanese culture, or stereotyping of the same. I haven’t much knowledge on Japanese culture, and decided to read this book knowing it is a fantasy novel, and not actually in set Japan, but Shima, a fictional location.

Another thoroughly enjoyable read from Jay Kristoff with characters to love. Yukiko and Buruu’s relationship was well crafted and had me giggling at times. The sub-characters were all perfectly flawed, and added to the narrative.

I found the beginning a little hard going, but one advantage of lots of description and  slow, world-building is an indepth, immersive read. Seriously, it is worth ploughing on. Steam-punk twinned with Japanese elements was an interesting mix, and the two worked well together to create a vivid world.

The ending was worth the journey: surprises, shocks, and oh, my poor heart. I have book two, Kinslayer, to read, and I doubt it will be long before I have to return to Yukiko’s world. The title makes me a little worried, though. Kinslayer… Kin-slayer…. I hope I’m thinking on it too much.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Save

Review: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

book-review

The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson 4/5

6tag_160717-063147In this harrowing tale of good and evil, the mild-mannered Dr. Jekyll develops a potion that unleashes his secret, inner persona—the loathsome, twisted Mr. Hyde.

Review:

Dr Jekyll’s friends are worried about him. Should he die or vanish, the civilised doctor has bequeathed his entire fortune to a man who oozes evil, Mr Hyde. How are the two men acquainted, and how can they make Jekyll see sense?

Let me first state that I know this story, but I have never actually read the book until now. Various retellings, shows/films etc ensure that no one can grow up without at least hearing of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and the narrative basics. It’s bizarre to start a story knowing the story. Does that sound as weird to you as it does to me?

I was pleasantly surprised to feel as though the story was fresh to me. This book explores the different sides to identity, and how both good and evil are intertwined in us all, but if you allow it, the evil in us will win.

Despite the fact that this book is short, and nearly the entirety of the book is told from the friend’s perspectives, Stevenson does a brilliant job at character development for both Jekyll and Hyde. Jekyll’s statement at the end is brutally honest and logical, and although he realises the mistakes he made, he isn’t entirely remorseful. It is a chilling ending to a chilling read.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

January-June Reads Round Up

book review(3).png

Can you believe that we are half way through 2017 already? I am 38 books closer to my Goodreads annual target of 80, and here is the list of what I have read so far with my ratings and links to the full reviews:

  1. Jamaica Inn by Daphne Du Maurier 5/5: Review.
  2. Touch by Briana Morgan 4/5: Review.
  3. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss 4.5/5: Review.
  4. Surviving the Evacuation by Frank Tayell 3.5/5: Review.
  5. The Rose Society by Marie Lu 4/5: Review.
  6. Once Upon a Dream by Liz Braswell: DNF
  7. Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne Du Maurier 5/5: Review.
  8. Sufragette: The Diary of Dollie Baxter by Carol Drinkwater 3/5: Review.
  9. Old Man’s War by John Scalzi 3.5/5: Review.
  10. Hero of Ages by Brandon Sanderson 5/5: Review.
  11. True Calling by Siobhan Davis 4/5: Review.
  12. The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams 4/5: Review.
  13. Embers by Karen Ann Hopkins 3.5/5: Review.
  14. 25 Ways to Kill a Werewolf by Jo Thomas 3.5/5: Review.
  15. Nevernight by Jay Kristoff 4.5/5: Review.
  16. Resurrection by Brianna West 5/5: Review.
  17. Running Man by Stephen King 3.5/5: Review.
  18. If I Stay by Gayle Forman 3.5/5: Review.
  19. Carnival of Souls by Melissa Marr 3/5: Review.
  20. A Mere Interlude by Thomas Hardy 2.5/5: Review.
  21. Dolce Vita by Iseult Teren 3.5/5: Review.
  22. Eden by Michael Robertson 4/5: Review.
  23. Birthday Blaze by Kacey Shea 3/5: Review.
  24. Luna Proxy by Mac Flynn 3/5: Review.
  25. Shadow of the Wolf by Mac Flynn 2/5: Review.
  26. The Hospital by Keith. C. Blackmore 3/5: Review.
  27. Teeth by Michael Robertson 2/5: Review.
  28. Bad Decisions by E.M. Smith 3.5/5: Review.
  29. Fenix Rising by Jeff Liboiron 4/5: Review.
  30. What a Way to Go by Forster 3.5/5: Review.
  31. Self Edit Your Way to Awesome by K.L. Tolman 3.5/5: Review.
  32. Island by Nicky Singer 4.5/5: Review. 
  33. Unsanctioned Eyes by Brianna Merritt 5/5: Review.
  34. The Phoenix Cycle by Bob Collopy 3/5: Review.
  35. The King’s General by Daphne Du Maurier 4/5: Review.
  36. Bernie by Brianna West 5/5: Review.
  37. Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah. J. Maas 5/5: Review.
  38. Hell’s Teeth by James Fahy 5/5: Review.

Have you read any of these? What has been your favourite book so far this year? I have read so many great books it’s hard to choose. At this point, I would say that my favourite book is A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah. J. Maas.


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

CSave

Save

Save

Save

Review: A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah. J. Maas

book-review

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah. J. Maas 5/5

6tag_160617-214625Feyre’s survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price …

Dragged to a magical kingdom for the murder of a faerie, Feyre discovers that her captor, his face obscured by a jewelled mask, is hiding far more than his piercing green eyes would suggest. Feyre’s presence at the court is closely guarded, and as she begins to learn why, her feelings for him turn from hostility to passion and the faerie lands become an even more dangerous place. Feyre must fight to break an ancient curse, or she will lose him forever.

Review:

She hunts to feed her impoverished family, and her skill sees her kill a wolf like no other. Captured by a faerie for the debt she owes for taking a fae life, she is taken to the realm of the fae to spend the rest of her days with her captor. Little does she know why she is really there, why she is treated kindly despite killing a member of the Spring Court, and why her changing feelings toward her captor will see her fighting for her own life and freedom and that of the Spring Court.

Why have I not read this sooner? Seriously, this isn’t just one of my favourite reads this year, but of all time. Big praise, right? The world building is spectacular. I fully believed in Prythian and the fae. The way the land is governed, the animosity with the human realm, and the various creatures, curses, and festivals make for a thrilling read.

The plot was indepth and well written, and the flawed Feyre made for a brilliant heroine. The sub-characters all had vital roles in the narrative, and you root for them as much as you do Feyre. The blossoming relationship was just devine.

Team Tamlin? Team Lucien? Team Rhysand?… Depends what day of the week it is, right? I’m right!

When you’re both excited and scared to read the final one hundred pages it is testament to the story, and I have to admit, my tummy was somersaulting reading the last few chapters. It is glorious to find a book that can do that.

I picked up this book in my library, but now I have to buy all three. If there is one good thing about joining the hype train a little late in the game, it is that the whole series is ready and waiting.

Read this book, folks!


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

ARC Review: Bernie by Brianna West

book-review

Bernie by Brianna West 5/5

6tag_190617-110004Nyla, born and raised in the In-Between realm as the princess of the Spiritum Bellatorum, has been betrothed from birth and forced to conceal the true personality within in order to project herself as nothing but the perfect princess she was taught to be.

When her brother betrays their kind, Nyla acquires an unprecedented mission to find and convince him to come home. Teaming up with the Promiscus Guardians to locate her runaway brother in the mortal realm, Nyla is introduced to the resident comedian and self-proclaimed cowboy Guardian, Bernie.

He is everything she wishes she could be outwardly and she’s instantly intrigued by his happy, easy-going nature. But, like Nyla, Bernie is keeping a part of himself tightly locked away.

What will happen when their barriers start to come down? Will they be able to overcome so many obstacles laid out before them, or will their relationship be torn apart before they have a chance to find something deeper?

Thanks go to the author for giving me an e-copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

Review:

I think this might be my new favourite Guardian’s in Love book! After the fabulous Victor and Pavel, I did not think I’d be saying that, but there is something about the cheeky cowboy that draws you in. Bernie’s character has remained true to form throughout the Promiscus Guardians series and the spin offs, and has continued to do so in his own spin off. If anything, Bernie’s endearing side is heightened, and you quickly learn that there is more to the loveable rogue and that Nyla is an extremely lucky girl.

Nyla is the new love interest, but she is so much more: kick-ass Princess who knows what she wants and how to keep Bernie on his toes. West has a knack for writing feminine characters who embrace who they are and stand toe to toe with the brooding hunks.

It’s hard to delve into the story without spoilers, especially if you haven’t read the rest of the series. My advice for paranormal romance fans is to get your copy of Awakening (book one in the Promiscus Guardians series), and work your way through to Bernie’s story. It has to be done!


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: The King’s General by Daphne Du Maurier

book-review

The King’s General by Daphne Du Maurier 4/5

6tag_130617-191352Honor Harris is only 18 when she first meets Richard Grenvile, proud, reckless – and utterly captivating. But following a riding accident, Honor must reconcile herself to a life alone. As Richard rises through the ranks of the army, marries and makes enemies, Honor remains true to him, and finally discovers the secret of Menabilly.

 

Review:

Honor Harris looks back on her life from her teens, through the English Civil War, and after. Through her truthful recount of the man who stole her heart, Richard Grenvile, and her life in a wheelchair, she tells a tale of love, mystery, war, and misery.

Du Maurier never fails to create an atmospheric experience for the reader.  I was transported to Cornwall in the 1600’s, and through the eyes of Honor, I had a raw, real recount of the English Civil War.

Once again, the characters are brilliantly constructed. Their lives link beautifully with each other’s, and their personalities are expertly woven in the words. My reason for not rating this 5* is because of my dislike for Richard. Despite his affection toward Honor, I couldn’t find anything to like about the man. He remained true to character, but I like to have a least a small nugget of something worth rooting for. He was rude, arrogant, and had a huge sense of superiority. At least Honor was aware of his flaws and never tried to excuse them.

Another reason for my missing star is that at times the narrative was bogged down with the war and strategies etc. Yes, that was the main narrative running through the book, and yes, the title is The King’s General, but there were chapters that I skimmed because it was mere recount, and not vital to Honor’s story.

In summary, a solid read from Du Maurier with brilliantly written characters, engaging world building, and a glimpse into life for the Cornish during the English Civil War. If you don’t mind an obnoxious character or two, this is the read for you.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review