Books and Me

Goodreads Reading Challenge 2018

I have just realised that I have hit my 40 books Goodreads Challenge. Whoop whoop!

This year has been a little more hectic with the addition of my son, so last year’s 80 book goal was a no go. Halving that total for 2018 was spot on. Granted, I have read a lot of novellas due to a lack of time, but I’m amazed I hit 40 with how crazy this year has been.

However, that isn’t me done! I shall see what my actual amount is at the end of December.

Are you participating in the Goodreads Challenge? Have you hit your goal, or still working on it? There’s still time, so good luck.


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

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Book Reviews

Book Review: Kindle Income by Alex Foster

Kindle Income by Alex Foster 2.5/5


This book covers the fundamentals to making a living writing books for Kindle. How to set up your book from cover to description to maximize sales.
How to get motivated and pick which books to write. A beginner’s guide to starting with Kindle with the intent to profit. How to gather a following and write quickly to publish books faster.

Review:

I have to review this book from two view points. Firstly, the book didn’t offer me anything I didn’t already know, but would probably help out a new writer with zero knowledge of self publishing.

Secondly, I have read a good few of the books this author has released, and the information is recycled somewhat from book to book. All that seems different is the titles.

These books are not helpful for writers with a general knowledge of self publishing, and the content isn’t much varied, but on the other hand, newbies might benefit from them.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

updates

Update 31/08/18

Update 31/08/18

Once again, I’m going to post updates every month on where I am at with my writing or lack thereof.

Reading

Zero writing has taken place this month, but I have been reading up a storm. I caught up with my backlog of reviews, and next month, I plan to include what I read in my updates, but there are far too many reviews to include in today’s post.

Scheduling and Planning

The majority of my time, though incredibly limited by mama duties, was used scheduling five months of blog posts and starting to plan a marketing system for my books that works for me. Okay, so I’ll do one book shoutout. Five Minute Marketing for Authors by Barb Asselin has some interesting ideas I want to implement, and five minutes seems too good to be true, right? We’ll see.

For future reference, my Writerly Wisdom posts will go live every Wednesday, and my Updates posts will be featured on the last Friday of the month.

Coming Up

Keep your eyes peeled on my various social media platforms for any mini updates on how I’m doing with the above, and there are some book reviews coming soon. I hope you have a productive month.


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Book Reviews

Review: Black Virus by Bobby Adair

Black Virus by Bobby Adair 4.5/5

Alienated in a world where he doesn’t fit in, Christian Black survives because he’s different. Then the virus came, and made the world turn different, too.
Now people are dying by the million. Food supplies are short. Riots are blazing through the streets, and Christian’s only goal is to keep his family alive. But safety lies far from the city, and just getting out will be tougher than anyone knows.

Review:

It’s always great to find a new take on the zombie/infection genre. A strain of flu that some die from, some survive, or some are left with a mutation that slowly turns you into a ‘degenerate’, is right up my street.

This story focusses on Christian Black and his background. The foreword from the author was a little worrying for me as he states that he wrote Black Virus because when writing Black Rust he realised there wasn’t room for backstory with a fast paced plot. I disagree with this and believe good writing allows for both. So, even though Black Rust was written and published first, it has become book two. I was wary of Adair’s writing after reading the foreword.

That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed this take on the infection story, even more so because it is packed full of back story and world building. However, that foreword has made my wary of book two. If its all action and no character development or backstory in its own right, then I doubt I will like it as much as book one. I wish that foreword had been omitted.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

ARC Review: Raven’s Cry by Dana Fraedrich

Raven’s Cry by Dana Fraedrich 4.5/5

38323190.jpgA dark retelling of Swan Lake ~ Calandra is happiest when she’s surrounded by quiet, joined only by a book and a cup of tea, never around people and their insufferable need to make small talk. When Nicodemus, a magus with immense power, joins the royal court of Invarnis, Calandra’s life will change forever. As a terrible curse pursues her through the centuries, Calandra will have to overcome captivity, war, and loss.

In this standalone installment, set in Dana Fraedrich’s Broken Gears universe, readers will join Calandra in her battle for freedom, hope, and healing.

Raven’s Cry is out 1-5-18 !!!! Preorder your copy here.

Review:

After reading Fraedrich’s Out of the Shadows, I was keen for an ARC of Raven’s Cry. I haven’t yet read book two in the Broken Gears series, but it was easy to jump back in with this book as it is a standalone, yet still has links to Out of the Shadows for those who have read it. Don’t worry if you haven’t read the rest of the series, it won’t affect the narrative for you. Those links are only noticeable to readers of the other books.

The world building in Cali’s tale is just as thought out and imaginative. Cali’s story is tragic for centuries, but she somehow keeps her head and makes it through the torture and imprisonment at the hands of a powerful, evil magus.

Fraedrich has mastered the retelling well. I am not usually a fan of retellings, but as long as the narrative carries its weight in its own right with hints to the original, then I am a happy reader.

If you enjoy retellings, this dark retelling of Swan Lake is for you, and while you’re at it, why not get book one in the Broken Gears series?


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: Turning Grace by J.Q. Davis

book review

Turning Grace by J.Q. Davis 3/5
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Life or death?
It all seems to be the same for Grace…

Some of us have been there before — falling for the hot, popular jock who just so happens to be dating the hot, popular girl in school.

Your snarky-but-always-right bestie insists you make a move, but you’re not so much into putting yourself out there.

Then it happens, and suddenly you find yourself eating a cat on your neighbor’s porch.

No? Never happened to you?

Well, Grace Watkins can’t say the same. Her hunger is growing with each day that passes and her urges are getting harder to control.
No one can explain why her body is changing, except one man.

Review:

A zombie book that follows a teen injected with a untested serum as a child and the deterioration of her body and mind ever since.

It’s unusual to find a zombie book that doesn’t have an ‘outbreak’ or a virus that can be passed on through a bite. It was interesting to see the methods Davis thought up for Grace’s mother to use in order to maintain her daughter’s ignorance to what she truly was, and the repercussions of not explaining the situation to Grace when things start going severely south.

Some niggles I had were Grace’s naivety and Tristan’s utter acceptance. Insta-love is a well used trope in some YA stories, and maybe teens will find this book and the relationship dynamics more believable.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: 1984 by George Orwell

book review

1984 by George Orwell 3/5
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Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell’s nightmare vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff’s attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of the novel is Orwell’s prescience of modern life–the ubiquity of television, the distortion of the language–and his ability to construct such a thorough version of hell. Required reading for students since it was published, it ranks among the most terrifying novels ever written.

Review:

I’ve been meaning to read 1984 for a while. Of course, I knew of the concept (who doesn’t?), but there’s nothing like reading it for yourself. This review will probably sound cliche, but hey, I agree with the general concensus: ahead of its time, transcends generations, and is scarily familiar in 2018. That doesn’t mean I was overly enthralled in the narrative, more in awe of Orwell’s foresight.

This is a book that has a permanent place on the dystopian shelf as a founder and fore-runner in the genre. Orwell’s imagination is expansive and convincing.

“War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.”

How chilling is that?


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review