Guest Post: Brianna West on Character Development

book-review

Joining us today for a humour packed guest post on the importance of character develoment is the wonderfully talented author, Brianna West.


The Joys of Authorhood: Raising Fully Developed Characters

Hello all aspiring and current authors desperate to figure out how to fully raise your characters into complex, well-developed, functioning-in-plot characters! I’ve come here because I was once like you: scared, unsure, slightly crazier than normal people and talking to all the voices in my head. The characters whose names you need to figure out, whose personalities aren’t complex enough, aren’t realistic enough to be featured in your current or maybe not even your future work.

Don’t be discouraged! I’ve come to give you my experience with how to raise fully functioning, story-ready characters and how to develop them over the course of your work in progress.

First things first, whether you plot your story out, outlining every detail, or you just write where your characters lead you, guiding when need be, characters that aren’t fully developed can sometimes cause a story not to feel real or read as well as one that has characters fully realized.

  1. Aw, he’s got your morbid sense of humor—get to know what their personality is. This is something I tend to do when I’m “imagining” how I want interactions to go. Whether or not the two characters would fit together with certain aspects of their personality. It’s a good time to figure out what characteristics you might want from them. Are they quirky, broody, moody, playful, quiet, and so on so forth. It’s important to get to know them and figure out where their personality needs improvement or adjustment.
  2. Playdates are fun until someone’s kid gets killed—there’s been a time or two where I’ve been unable to fully grasp an interaction between two, mostly because I haven’t really written them before or it’s been a while. So, giving them a test run in a small written interaction might help tighten up some of the aspects you were hoping to achieve or where they could change when dealing with other characters.
  3. Scarred for life—backstory is something you can get away with not knowing much of to begin with, having it develop over the course of a story and getting to know their history as the story unfolds. But it’s a good idea to have some sort of idea where you want your character to have come from, even if just that their daddy was a drunk and their mommy a drug-dealer.
  4. Growing up sucks, but it’s great for plot—the most important is the growing and changing of a character over the course of a story or series. Seeing them change as it goes along, reacting and transforming due to encounters, other characters etc., it gives the reader a sense of knowing them and real-time movement that builds a relationship with the readers that all the above doesn’t build in such an intense way.

These are just a few things to think about when dealing with character development, but in the course of my authorhood, the most important. Hopefully these help you raise well-developed, happy characters and not angry, superficial serial killer characters that spend their life blaming their author (unless that’s what you were going for).

Happy Writing!

Brianna West.


71zctz9tEAL._UX250_.jpgBrianna West lives in beautiful Northern California with her wonderful husband and four adorable children. She writes funny, real stories that are accompanied by humor and supernatural elements. Recently published in October 2015, Brianna has gone on to add several books to her main series and spin-off series since then.

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My Time Jump Hack

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It’s happening. There is going to be a time jump in EVO Ghost. I have had conflicting advice on adding a time jump to my narrative, but in the end I thought , ‘a time jump will make me happy, and I write to make me happy’. I do feel it benefits the story for numerous reasons, and cuts out mundane routine that would be present if I mosied on through; first person present tense can be a little tricky that way.

imagesNow, I know I’ve got a lot of work to do to pull the time jump off, but I know I can do it, and make it beneficial to the narrative.

I’ve already discovered one hack that has been great for getting back into the headspace of all the main and secondary characters- renewed character notes!

I am focussing on each character separately, not solely thinking about them in terms of their relationship toward my MC, but in terms of where their heads are at. What has happened during the time jump? How did the situation at the end of book two affect them? Where do they fit in the new world? This practice in itself is great for inspiring narrative developments and plot twists. Some people have changed for the better, others for the worse, some tug on my heart strings. At least I know where to go with the narrative and character development.

Have you ever written a time jump into your narrative? Did it work? Did it prove harder than imagined?


Content belongs to KJ.Chapman

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