Books and Me

If you like… The Lovely Bones

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 The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

Blurb: The Lovely Bones is the story of a family devastated by a gruesome murder — a murder recounted by the teenage victim. Upsetting, you say? Remarkably, first-time novelist Alice Sebold takes this difficult material and delivers a compelling and accomplished exploration of a fractured family’s need for peace and closure.

The details of the crime are laid out in the first few pages: from her vantage point in heaven, Susie Salmon describes how she was confronted by the murderer one December afternoon on her way home from school. Lured into an underground hiding place, she was raped and killed. But what the reader knows, her family does not. Anxiously, we keep vigil with Susie, aching for her grieving family, desperate for the killer to be found and punished.

Sebold creates a heaven that’s calm and comforting, a place whose residents can have whatever they enjoyed when they were alive — and then some. But Susie isn’t ready to release her hold on life just yet, and she intensely watches her family and friends as they struggle to cope with a reality in which she is no longer a part. To her great credit, Sebold has shaped one of the most loving and sympathetic fathers in contemporary literature.

Room by Emma Donoghue

Blurb: To five-year-old Jack, Room is the entire world. It is where he was born and grew up; it’s where he lives with his Ma as they learn and read and eat and sleep and play. At night, his Ma shuts him safely in the wardrobe, where he is meant to be asleep when Old Nick visits.

Room is home to Jack, but to Ma, it is the prison where Old Nick has held her captive for seven years. Through determination, ingenuity, and fierce motherly love, Ma has created a life for Jack. But she knows it’s not enough…not for her or for him. She devises a bold escape plan, one that relies on her young son’s bravery and a lot of luck. What she does not realize is just how unprepared she is for the plan to actually work.

Told entirely in the language of the energetic, pragmatic five-year-old Jack, Room is a celebration of resilience and the limitless bond between parent and child, a brilliantly executed novel about what it means to journey from one world to another.


Content and opinions belong to KJ.Chapman

Pictures and blurbs sourced from Goodreads.com

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: Grey by Kade Cook

book review(1)

Grey (Covenant of Shadows #1) by Kade Cook 3/5

14341454_1270502796334468_2041794031_nAll the truths of her life were born from the promise of a lie. A lie that could change everything. Gabrian Shadwell studied hard and kept her nose to the grindstone in order to live the successful full-life most humans strive for. The problem is, she isn’t exactly human; she can see auras…and she yearns to devour them-she is comprised of the things nightmares are made of. With her eyes opened to the truth of her Borrower heritage, her chaotic journey of self-discovery takes her down a dangerous road when the tainted eyes of the self-righteous Elders in the Realm turn against her. With good and evil before her, she must choose which path she will walk upon and learn the biggest truth of her life. The only difference between a Borrower and a Vampire is hope.

Thanks goes to Rambunctious Ramblings Publishing Inc for giving me a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinion.

Review:

Gabrian was living an ordinary working life with a loyal best friend, loving parents, and a good job, but things change for Gabrian in the blink of an eye. People in her life are not who she thought they were, the world is not as it seems, and she is not the human she believed she was.

I am not usually a fan of prologues, but this one really piqued my interest. The story didn’t live up to the prologue for the first few chapters, but it did gather momentum and delve into a unique story line of Vampires, Shadow Walkers, and Mages.

I felt the pace was a little off throughout the book. As soon as I thought something was happening, and everything was stepping up a notch, it was followed by slower chapters full of info dumps. The descriptions of the realms and the different types of people and abilities were detailed and well thought through, and the concept and imaginative aspects involved were impressive, however, I would have preferred to have it shown to me in snippets rather than lengthy dialogue.

I am a fan of large character casts with distinct personalities, and this book certainly had a vast array of characters with their own back stories that interweave into Gabrian’s story arc. I can not fault Cook’s character development, or her ability to narrate well rounded relationships, considering the complex world building that takes place within the narrative. However, the book felt considerably lengthy.


 

The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

 

 

Book Reviews

Review: Burn the Dead: Quarantine by Steven Jenkins

book review(1)

Burn the Dead: Quarantine by Steven Jenkins 4/5

14328879_1269538459764235_641140964_nRobert Stephenson makes his living burning zombies – a job that pays the bills and plays tricks on the mind. Still, his life is routine until one day his infected wife, Anna, shows up in line for the incinerator, and Rob must cremate the love of his life.

In a race against the clock, he must find his four-year-old son Sammy, who is stranded in a newly quarantined zone, teeming with the walking dead, and crawling with the Necro-Morbus virus.

Does Rob have what it takes to fight the undead and put his broken family back together?

Or will he also end up in the incinerator – burning with the rest of the dead?

I downloaded this book for FREE from Amazon Kindle

Review:

Zombies or ‘Necs’ are a real thing and normal human life carries on around them. There are even companies that incinerate the Necs- Robert works for such a company and is what they call a ‘Burner’. Infection breakouts are common, but quickly maintained. But what happens when they cannot be quickly maintained? When human misjudgment, or empathy for their infected families, or simple idiocy, gets in the way of the greater good?

Jenkins has a knack for shock- not simply by gore, but by cleverly mastered plot twists. I had only read 10% and I already had a ‘wow, I did not see that coming’ moment. Those moments are not sparse. Throughout the book, Jenkins continually surprises the reader.

The narrative was well paced and all the characters were believable. The range of emotions that Robert goes through in his quest to find his son are honest and his character felt well rounded. His character arc developed narturally, and his fatherly instincts take over an otherwise subdued man.

Zombie novels are everywhere and are full of the usual cliche tropes. This book felt different. I can’t put my finger on exactly why it did because there are some of the expected tropes throughout, however, the narrative felt fresh.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

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Book Reviews, Books and Me

If You Like…Maze Runner

If you like...(5)

Maze Runner by James Dashner

Blurb: If you ain’t scared, you ain’t human.

When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his name. He’s surrounded by strangers—boys whose memories are also gone.

Nice to meet ya, shank. Welcome to the Glade.

Outside the towering stone walls that surround the Glade is a limitless, ever-changing maze. It’s the only way out—and no one’s ever made it through alive.

Everything is going to change.

Then a girl arrives. The first girl ever. And the message she delivers is terrifying.

Remember. Survive. Run.

The Last Orphans by N.W.Harris

Blurb: One horrifying day will change the life of sixteen-year-old Shane Tucker and every other kid in the world.

In a span of mere hours, the entire adult population is decimated, leaving their children behind to fend for themselves and deal with the horrific aftermath of the freak occurrence. As one of the newly made elders in his small town, Shane finds himself taking on the role of caretaker for a large group of juvenile survivors. One who just happens to be Kelly Douglas—an out-of-his-league classmate—who, on any other day, would have never given Shane a second glance.

Together, they begin their quest to find out why all of the adults were slaughtered. What they find is even more horrifying than anything they could have expected—the annihilation of the adults was only the beginning. Shane and his friends are not the unlucky survivors left to inherit this new, messed-up planet. No, they are its next victims. There is an unknown power out there, and it won’t stop until every person in the world is dead.



Content and opinions belong to KJ.Chapman

Blurbs and Images sourced from Goodreads.com

Book Reviews, Books and Me, Uncategorized

Review: Feyland: The First Adventure by Anthea Sharp

book review(1)

Feyland: The First Adventure (a prequel) by Anthea Sharp 2.5/5

14269639_1264856833565731_1283666633_nHigh-tech gaming and ancient magic collide when a computer game opens a gateway to the treacherous Realm of Faerie.

Jennet Carter never thought hacking into her dad’s new epic-fantasy sim-game would be so exciting… or dangerous. Behind the interface, dark forces lie in wait, leading her toward a battle that will test her to her limits and cost her more than she ever imagined.

I downloaded this novella for free from Amazon Kindle.

Review:

I have not read any of the books in the Feyland series, so I went into the prequel with absolutely no knowledge of the world or narrative. The concept is not an original one; virtual reality game gives user access into another realm, but the descriptions were vivid and brought Feyland to life.

Rather than acting like a prequel in its own right, the whole narrative felt more like a prologue for the Feyland series. There was very little conclusion, and was simply building up to the first book, rather than telling it’s own story completely and fully. There was zero explanation of the ‘game to another realm’ technology, or any meaningful interaction with the Feyland inhabitants. There was, however, backstory on both Jennet and her father.

The book read well, and the elements of reality, Feyland, and gaming were woven together confidently, but I shall not be looking to read the Feyland series.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

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Book Reviews, Books and Me

REVIEW: The Last Orphans by N.W.Harris

book review(1)

The Last Orphans (Vol #1) by N.W.Harris

14012220_1245851038799644_1955197727_nOne horrifying day will change the life of sixteen-year-old Shane Tucker and every other kid in the world.

In a span of mere hours, the entire adult population is decimated, leaving their children behind to fend for themselves and deal with the horrific aftermath of the freak occurrence. As one of the newly made elders in his small town, Shane finds himself taking on the role of caretaker for a large group of juvenile survivors. One who just happens to be Kelly Douglas—an out-of-his-league classmate—who, on any other day, would have never given Shane a second glance.

Together, they begin their quest to find out why all of the adults were slaughtered. What they find is even more horrifying than anything they could have expected—the annihilation of the adults was only the beginning. Shane and his friends are not the unlucky survivors left to inherit this new, messed-up planet. No, they are its next victims. There is an unknown power out there, and it won’t stop until every person in the world is dead.

A spine-tingling adventure that will have you gasping for breath all the way until the last page, The Last Orphans is the first book in an all-new apocalyptic series.

I purchased this book for free from Amazon Kindle.

Review:

What would you do if all the adults on earth were dead, and you knew that unless you stopped the weapon that caused the slaughter, it will slowly start to turn against the younger generations? Not only that, you are one of the oldest children still alive- a teenager- with over seventy younger children looking to you as their leader?

This book was a pleasant surprise. I can’t believe that you can pick it up for free on Amazon Kindle. I thoroughly enjoyed this well written, perfectly paced, action packed story. Harris has a natural talent for moving along the narrative from one chapter to the next, and having group dynamics and relationships moving effortlessly along with it.

The older children, who have taken charge of the younger children, have not only to deal with the effects of the weapon, but other less accommodating gangs in the city. Each person plays a role in the group and have distinct personalities. There are deaths, and yes, they pack a punch.

The ending was brilliant and ended on a huge cliff hanger. I shall be buying the rest of the series for sure- as in this week.

If you are a fan of well written apocalypse stories with a great crew of characters, then get this book. It’s FREE people.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

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Thrown to The Blue

Thrown to The Blue Blurb Reveal!

big news!

The blurb for Thrown to The Blue is here!

blurb reveal.png

I’m not going to lie, this was a tricky one to write. I wanted to capture the tone of the book, add some narrative, but not give too much away. I hope I pulled it off.

The next announcemnet will be the release date, however, that is not finalised as of yet. Keep an ear out of that one.

I shall be sending out ARCs when the editing is complete, so if you are not already on my list and would like to be an ARC reviewer, please give me a shout.


Content belongs to KJ.Chapman