Review: Timewalker by Justin Stanchfield

book-review

Timewalker by Justin Stanchfield 3/5

6tag_140917-114552.jpgSean thinks he’s going crazy when a girl from his nightmares appears to him on a lonely road. But the deadly enemies that are chasing her across time and space are no dream-and they will stop at nothing to destroy the future of the human race.

Sean agrees to help the girl, but there’s something she is still hiding from him… The truth is, Sean is the only one who can save mankind. He just doesn’t know it yet.

Review:

I picked up this book from the sci-fi section in my library, but it would be more at home in the young adult section. Young teens would appreciate this book and relate to the young characters. The beginning is a little slow, but there is a definite Stranger Things vibe: teen brothers harbouring a strange girl with powers who appeared from nowhere.

Many questions arise throughout the narrative, and are all answered as you move forward. Some are predictable, some not so. I enjoyed learning more about Hamilton and his intentions, or rather the intentions of his ‘bosses’.

Some relationships felt a little forced to me. Sean admits to ‘falling’ after knowing Kyr for a few days. Seeing her in his nightmares isn’t quite the makings of love. However, the switch up in Kyr’s affections, and the relationship between the boys and their father, was well developed and believable. It held weight where everything else was spiralling into the unknown.

I’d recommend this to teen readers who enjoy all things science fiction.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Advertisements

Release Day: Zombie Playlist

book-review13

Whoop Whoop! Today is the day that Zombie Playlist is released into the wild. I hope the world is ready for Dagger.

I would like to thank every one of my ARC readers for taking the time to read and review. You’ve given Dagger a brilliant chance on her special day. Check out the beta and ARC reviews on Goodreads.

Get your copy of Zombie Playlist here.

zombie-playlist8Blurb: Dagger has survived the zombie apocalypse with nothing save a metal bat, blades, and assholery. With the company of an IPOD she attained courtesy of Dead-Dude, and King, the Bunker-Boy straggler she somehow acquired on her journey, she travels to the coast, putting down zombies, blowing up high-grade assholes, and teaching King how to ditch his pre-apocalypse conscience and keep his yellow ass alive.

 


Content belongs to K.J. Chapman

August Reads Round Up

book-review1

Black-Eyed Devils by Catrin Collier

5528155Full Review: Black-Eyed Devils

I rate this book 5/5. Historical truths, teamed with believable characters and back story make for an interesting read. Everything is against Amy and Tom. He is a ‘Blackleg’ brought in by mine bosses to fill the jobs of the striking miners. Amy’s father and brother are striking miners. Need I say more?

A Shining in the Shadows by Beverley Lee

6tag_130817-200747Full Review: A Shining in the Shadows

I rate this book 5/5. A brilliant interpretation on the vampire genre. Effortless plot twists, relationship growth, and character development. Highly recommended, and I can’t wait for book three.

 

Never Too Late by Jane Laird

6tag_190817-073513Full Review: Never Too Late.

I rate this book 2/5. This readd is very short, and left little time for character development. The story is swett, but I found the ending forced.

 

Hellfire by Drew Avera

6tag_190817-073430Full Review: Hellfire.

I rate this book 4/5. This scifi, military tale drew me in and kept me enthralled. I would love to see this addaptedd into a full length novel. The ending was brilliant and unexpected.

 

I Still Love You by Jane Lark

6tag_190817-073804Full Review: I Still Love You.

I rate this book 2/5. The writing was fine, but the topic was far too depressing for my tastes. Don’t get me wrong, the topic is important to highlight, but this book was just not my cup of tea.

 

The God Machine by Mikey Campling, Drew Avera, Christopher Godsoe, and Jamie Dodge

6tag_190817-073558Full Review: The God Machine.

I rate this book 3/5. A unique concept that could easily be expanded. Considering this is the work of four authors, it didn’t jar with me, and the writing styles ran smoothly throughout.

Review: Black-Eyed Devils by Catrin Collier (Short Story)

book-review

Black-Eyed Devils by Catrin Collier 5/5

5528155One look was enough. Amy Watkins and miner ‘Big’ Tom Kelly were in love. But can they keep their feelings secret or face the threat of death in a community torn apart by the miner’s strike? Tonypandy, South Wales, 1911. Starving, striking miners fight soldiers and police on the picket lines for the right to earn a wage that will feed their families, while Irish labourers are brought in the take their place in the pits, for half their pay. Handsome ‘Big’ Tom Kelly, an Irish worker, comes to Wales looking for a better life and believes he has found it when he falls in love with Amy Watkins, the daughter of a strike leader. At night, the miners search out the Irish men, drag them from their beds, beat them and then hang them from the street lamp posts. Can Amy and Tom keep their love a secret forever? All they want is a future together. But in a world full of hatred, anger and violence, their dream seems impossible. Until another strike leader offers them a way out.

Review:

This is short story included in the Quick Reads Campaign. Quick Reads can be read in one or two sittings.

I was thoroughly drawn into Amy and Tom’s story. The Welsh miners in Tonypandy went on strike, and the mine bosses brought in Irish men to fill their jobs. Needless to say, the locals were not happy. One of these Irish ‘Blacklegs’ is Tom, and he falls head over heels for Amy, the daughter of one of the striking miners. The historical truths, teamed with the main characters and sub characters backstories make for an interesting read. You can’t help but root for Amy and Tom, and the ending was perfect.

I would recommend this book as a summer read, and those interested in historical fiction would enjoy this story.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: A Shining in the Shadows by Beverley Lee

book-review

A Shining in the Shadows (Gabriel Davenport #2) by Beverley Lee 5/5

6tag_130817-200747Gabriel Davenport has been remade from darkness. Now, he must adapt to survive .

In a small seaside town, Gabriel’s maker unwittingly takes his wards into the throes of a deadly new game. There are rumblings on The Bloodvyne, the mental web of linked vampire consciousness. Whispers about a cleansing, about the ruling council hunting vampires with impure blood.

Gabriel finds himself thrust into a new nightmare, where the hunter becomes the hunted. When his maker is taken, he must battle to untangle the mystifying clues laid out in an uncovered labyrinth to find the only creature strong enough to fight against those that hunt his new-found family.

Gaze long into the darkness, and you’ll find old vampire foes out for revenge, new ones with their own agenda, and a witch who holds the key. But just who is the monster in the middle?

Review:

Another masterpiece from Lee. After relishing Lee’s effortless writing style in book one, I was yet again sucked into Gabriel’s world and led like a sleepwalker through the pages and plot twists with ease. Lee makes writing seem easy. The pacing, narrative, and character development has a superb flow, and as a reader, you wake up at the end wondering where you are and how you got there. Book hangover!

Some points that I have to mention:

  1. The relationship dynamics are on fire. There are some curve balls, and then relationships that blossom organically, despite initial thoughts.
  2.  Plot twists are subtley woven into the narrative. The ending is a weaving together of story pieces. Writing tapestry.
  3. Character development is a huge part of my reading experience. When you’re rooting for anti-heroes of sorts, you know the writer has got it right.

In summary, this is a vampire read that isn’t cliche. The characters and relationships are well crafted, and the story is littered with breadcrumbs that tie up effortlessly at the end. I highly recommend this series.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah. J. Maas

book-review

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah. J. Maas 5/5

6tag_160617-214625Feyre’s survival rests upon her ability to hunt and kill – the forest where she lives is a cold, bleak place in the long winter months. So when she spots a deer in the forest being pursued by a wolf, she cannot resist fighting it for the flesh. But to do so, she must kill the predator and killing something so precious comes at a price …

Dragged to a magical kingdom for the murder of a faerie, Feyre discovers that her captor, his face obscured by a jewelled mask, is hiding far more than his piercing green eyes would suggest. Feyre’s presence at the court is closely guarded, and as she begins to learn why, her feelings for him turn from hostility to passion and the faerie lands become an even more dangerous place. Feyre must fight to break an ancient curse, or she will lose him forever.

Review:

She hunts to feed her impoverished family, and her skill sees her kill a wolf like no other. Captured by a faerie for the debt she owes for taking a fae life, she is taken to the realm of the fae to spend the rest of her days with her captor. Little does she know why she is really there, why she is treated kindly despite killing a member of the Spring Court, and why her changing feelings toward her captor will see her fighting for her own life and freedom and that of the Spring Court.

Why have I not read this sooner? Seriously, this isn’t just one of my favourite reads this year, but of all time. Big praise, right? The world building is spectacular. I fully believed in Prythian and the fae. The way the land is governed, the animosity with the human realm, and the various creatures, curses, and festivals make for a thrilling read.

The plot was indepth and well written, and the flawed Feyre made for a brilliant heroine. The sub-characters all had vital roles in the narrative, and you root for them as much as you do Feyre. The blossoming relationship was just devine.

Team Tamlin? Team Lucien? Team Rhysand?… Depends what day of the week it is, right? I’m right!

When you’re both excited and scared to read the final one hundred pages it is testament to the story, and I have to admit, my tummy was somersaulting reading the last few chapters. It is glorious to find a book that can do that.

I picked up this book in my library, but now I have to buy all three. If there is one good thing about joining the hype train a little late in the game, it is that the whole series is ready and waiting.

Read this book, folks!


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Review: The King’s General by Daphne Du Maurier

book-review

The King’s General by Daphne Du Maurier 4/5

6tag_130617-191352Honor Harris is only 18 when she first meets Richard Grenvile, proud, reckless – and utterly captivating. But following a riding accident, Honor must reconcile herself to a life alone. As Richard rises through the ranks of the army, marries and makes enemies, Honor remains true to him, and finally discovers the secret of Menabilly.

 

Review:

Honor Harris looks back on her life from her teens, through the English Civil War, and after. Through her truthful recount of the man who stole her heart, Richard Grenvile, and her life in a wheelchair, she tells a tale of love, mystery, war, and misery.

Du Maurier never fails to create an atmospheric experience for the reader.  I was transported to Cornwall in the 1600’s, and through the eyes of Honor, I had a raw, real recount of the English Civil War.

Once again, the characters are brilliantly constructed. Their lives link beautifully with each other’s, and their personalities are expertly woven in the words. My reason for not rating this 5* is because of my dislike for Richard. Despite his affection toward Honor, I couldn’t find anything to like about the man. He remained true to character, but I like to have a least a small nugget of something worth rooting for. He was rude, arrogant, and had a huge sense of superiority. At least Honor was aware of his flaws and never tried to excuse them.

Another reason for my missing star is that at times the narrative was bogged down with the war and strategies etc. Yes, that was the main narrative running through the book, and yes, the title is The King’s General, but there were chapters that I skimmed because it was mere recount, and not vital to Honor’s story.

In summary, a solid read from Du Maurier with brilliantly written characters, engaging world building, and a glimpse into life for the Cornish during the English Civil War. If you don’t mind an obnoxious character or two, this is the read for you.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Blog Tour: Resurrection by Brianna West

resurrection_cs1

Today, I am happy to host Brianna West on Writerly Bookish Stuff as part of the blog tour for her upcoming, April 28th release of Resurrection. Resurrection is the fourth and final book in the Promiscus Guardians series and is available to pre-order from Amazon. If you are a paranormal romance fan, then this is the series for you.

51y23vyVFNL._SY346_Izzy is back again after managing to survive villain after villain, and now she’s got her eyes on the prize—Mother Dearest. But her world takes a turn when she discovers something that might make her think twice about her usual reckless guns-blazing style.

And when a new evil villain joins forces with Mother Dearest, Izzy and Lucas are forced to partner with someone quite unlikely and a little too close to the villain they’re after.

With the final battle looming and a host of new problems, will Izzy and Lucas find a way to survive, or will the odds be too much and overcome them?

Find out in Izzy’s final kick-ass fight against the Dark, Resurrection.

Brianna West has given us a conclusion to Izzy and Lucas’ story, and what a conclusion it is. I was lucky enough to get an ARC of Resurrection. I devoured it much like the rest of the series. Find my review here.

So, without further ado, let me tease you a little…

Resurrection Teaser_1_1

resurrection_cslucas

Release Event and Giveaways Link: Facebook Event

Buy Links:

Amazon US: Preorder here!

Amazon UK: Preorder here!

Find more ARC reviews here: Goodreads

Good luck with the upcoming release, Brianna!


71zctz9teal-_ux250_Find Brianna:

 


For use of Resurrection related content, please contact the author, Brianna West.

Save

Indie Book Advent #8

monthly-reads-roundup7

Day 8 of my Indie Book Advent features L.M. Bryski’s Book of Birds.

41fslX0OMeL.jpgIn post-war Canada during the late 1940s, Elly McGuinty and her younger sister, Dot, are newly orphaned. The girls are sent to live with their grandparents in a small prairie town. Still grieving the loss of her parents, Elly chafes at the responsibility of helping care for Dot and struggles to find a place for herself in her new life. When a travelling circus comes to town, Elly’s desire for new experiences leads her, Dot, and new friend Stammer – a shy boy mocked for his halting voice – down a path where lives are altered forever.

Where to Find Bryski and her book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Twitter

2001

 

Review: The Beautiful Screaming of Pigs by Damon Galgut

The Beautiful Screaming of Pigs by Damon Galgut 3.5/5

Blurb: A year ago Patrick Winter was in Namibia completing his military service. Now, during the first free elections, Patrick has returned to the country he defended; the place where he fell in love for the first and only time. With the country poised to change forever, Patrick is forced to revisit his past and scale the wall that he has built around his painful memories of love and war, and loss.

Review:

Patrick is a white South African who had been drafted into the South African army to fight at the border of Namibia in the 1980’s; a war he never believed in. He had a breakdown after a soldier he loved was killed in combat, and now, after an honourable discharge, he has to start his life again with sexual orientation confusion, a promiscuous mother, and her Namibian, SWAPO activist lover. The narrative shows Patrick’s struggle with his identity, whilst highlighting an important historical moment in Africa.

The story starts with Patrick and his mother heading to Namibia for the first democratic elections, and jumps from present time to his time in the war. The writing is beautiful and controlled. I was continuously in awe of Galgut’s simplistic, yet impactual descriptions and prose.

‘Maybe somewhere in space light has preserved the image of that moment, suspended and infinite.’

The dialogue was on point throughout the whole novel, recounted in Patrick’s slightly detached POV.

“Have you ever been in love?”

“Yes. Once. I think so. I’m not sure.”

“You never told me about it.”

“I don’t think I knew at the time.”

The ending was anti-climatic, and kind of just…was an end, if that makes sense. I was hoping for more of a climax or pivotal moment for Patrick, but that didn’t take away from the story.


 

The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties.

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman.

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review.

Save