Review: Embers by Karen Ann Hopkins

book-review

Embers by Karen Ann Hopkins 3.5/5

17198856_1455014497883296_844697927_nThere are descendants of angels walking among us. Ember is one of them.

Embers is an epic paranormal adventure/romance about a seventeen year old girl who discovers that she’s immune to fire and any other injury when she’s in a horrific car crash that kills her parents. Following a violent episode with her aunt’s boyfriend, Ember flees Ohio to live with an old relative in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. Ember’s exuberance at escaping a bad home life soon turns to trepidation when she learns that she’s a Watcher, a descendant of angels.

While Ember is instructed about her heritage and the powers that go along with it, she strikes up friendships with two teenagers who live in a frightening walled compound in the forest. Inexplicitly drawn to one of the young men in particular, an impossible romance develops. But it’s cut short when Ember discovers that her new friends are fighting on the opposite side of a war that’s been raging between two factions of Watchers for thousands of years. When the compound’s inhabitants threaten the townspeople, Ember takes action, sealing her fate in the ancient battle of good versus evil, and the grayness in between. Ember is up to the challenge, until she realizes that she isn’t only fighting for the lives of the locals and the souls of her new friends. She may be one of the few champions willing to make a stand for all of mankind as the rapture approaches and the end of days begin.

Review:

Ember is no ordinary human, she is a Watcher. Watchers are descendants of Angels. If there are angels, then there must be demons, right? Right! Sawyer is just that, yet the two can’t fight their feelings for each other. Should they fight it? How will they overcome the divide, protect each other, and ultimately face the end of the world.

The concept may not be original, but I found myself intrigued with the storyline. Twilight fans would love this book, and luckily, Ember is a fiery, strong minded girl, so no Bella Swan damsels here. Phew! The relationship was fast moving, but the nature of the connection allows for this. Another relationship that I enjoyed was that of Ember and Ila. There were clashing personalities, tense/ untrusting moments, and affection, that made the dynamics that much more interesting and believable.

The different POVs were refreshing, allowing us insight into both Ember’s and Sawyer’s mind-set. The last chapter is in a completely different POV, and this has intrigued me greatly.

Can I just mention the cover? It’s a thing of beauty, and although I rarely discuss covers in my reviews, this one definitely grabbed my attention and bumped this read up my TBR pile. This book is suited to YA, paranormal romance fans, and those who like the Twilight Saga.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

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February Reads Round Up

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Frenchman’s Creek by Daphne Du Maurier

16443577_1422744914443588_878056584_nFull Review: Frenchman’s Creek.

I gave this book 5/5. Another Du Maurier masterpiece. Pirates, Cornwall, and adventure. Brilliantly written characters and narrative that keeps you enthralled. A healthy dose of danger and macabre. Highly recommended.

 

Old Man’s War by John Scalzi

16809103_1436806583037421_1035257087_nFull Review: Old Man’s War.

I gave this book 3.5/5. Interesting concept of space colonisation, elderly recruits given young bodies to fight in the army, and sci-fi by the bucket load. I found the age aspect refreshing; old minds in young bodies.

 

Hero of Ages by Brandon Sanderson

16780461_1433774133340666_2063343453_nFull Review: The Hero fo Ages.

I gave this book 5/5. Perfect way to conclude the trilogy. Nothing I say will do this series justice. Epic world building, character development, and narrative progression. A series not to be missed.

 

Suffragette: The Diary of Dottie Baxter by Carol Drinkwater

16707182_1431094340275312_273811952_nFull Review: Suffragette: The Diary of Dollie Baxter.

I gave this book 3/5. I’m not usually one for reading books with a diary excerpt layout as I find them jarring. That being said, this book has long excerpt so its not too choppy. A great way to educate young adults in the Suffragette movement.

 

True Calling by Siobhan Davis

16977056_1445355945515818_1947444955_nFull Review: True Calling

I gave this book 4/5. A new planet to sustain human life, a bizarre, televised, ‘pairing system’ to ensure reproduction, and an enormous dose of deception. The two POVs gave the narrative another dimension, and the love triangle was fun to read. One for Hunger Games and Divergent fans.

 


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

Review: True Calling by Siobhan Davis

book-review

True Calling by Siobhan Davis 4/5

16977056_1445355945515818_1947444955_n.jpgFor Ariana Skyee, Planet Novo was everything it promised to be until the authorities introduced “The Calling” as their response to repopulation. Now, all seventeen-year-olds are to participate in this Bachelor-style pageant to find their perfect match, marry, and have children.

But that’s not Ariana’s only concern. Thanks to the government-sanctioned memory erase, she has no recollection of Zane, the mystery boy who haunts her dreams. Things are further complicated when the pageant commences and her feelings for fellow Cadet Cal Remus intensify. Together, they start to realize not everything about their new home is as it seems.

Entangled in a dangerous web of deceit, Ariana sets out to identify the truth. Conflicted over warnings that Cal isn’t trustworthy and alarmed at the government’s increasing interest in her, she doesn’t know where to turn. But her search for the truth comes at a high personal price. When her world implodes, discovering the past shapes her future with devastating consequences.

Review:

Ariana lives on Planet Novo, a man-made habitat twelve hundred miles from the surface of Earth. Repopulation is taken seriously and The Calling is a bizarre, televised way to pair seventeen year olds with their perfect match to ensure more children.

I started reading this book in 2016, but had to stop due to ARCs and review requests. I picked up where I left off and easily fell back into the story once again.

This book had a strong Hunger Games feel to it- without the killing of the opponants. The us and them (government) factor was a strong, underlying theme. I found The Calling a weird, futuristic way to pair people to repopulate. It’s a unique concept, and I had great fun learning how the system was set up and at what lengths the government would go to ensure it’s success.

That’s not all. Ariana is caught in a love triangle; one that enfolds for Ariana just as much as it does for the reader. What are the government hiding? Ariana has to try and fill in the void of her erased memories and keep those feelings separate from her current feelings. The narrative is well paced and kept me engaged until the end. I want to say more, but I must refrain from spoilers.

The two POVs added an interesting dynamic to the narrative. I enjoyed Zane’s perspective, although, I did feel like I was getting double doses of the same information from time to time.

Fans of the Hunger Games and Divergent will enjoy True Calling immensely.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

 

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Review: Old Man’s War by John Scalzi

book-review

Old Man’s War by John Scalzi 3.5/5

16809103_1436806583037421_1035257087_nWith his wife dead and buried, and life nearly over at 75, John Perry takes the only logical course of action left: he joins the army. Now better known as the Colonial Defense Force (CDF), Perry’s service-of-choice has extended its reach into interstellar space to pave the way for human colonization of other planets while fending off marauding aliens.

The CDF has a trick up its sleeve that makes enlistment especially enticing for seniors: the promise of restoring their youth. After bonding with a group of fellow recruits who dub their clique the Old Farts, Perry finds himself in a new body crafted from his original DNA and upgraded for battle, including a brain-implanted computer. But all too quickly the Old Farts are separated, and Perry must fight for his life on various alien-infested battlegrounds.

Review:

I have been neglecting my sci-fi reads of late. I wanted something to get me thinking, take me on an adventure in space, and surprise me at every turn. Old Man’s war has a fantastic concept: take old people, give them a new body, but on one condition… they are part of a space army, and their youth comes at a price.

During the first one hundred pages or so, I could easily stop and start this book. Sometimes, going days between reading it, helped me to get back into the story when I found the time. That being said, it did pick up, and I read the remainder of the book much more quickly.

Scalzi’s imagination is broad and a wonder to read. I wanted sci-fi and I got sci-fi by the bucket load. The characters were refreshing; the older generation- even after they swap bodies- still had seventy-five year old, wise minds. It was a fun mix of old and young. And what would you do if you were seventy-five and suddenly in a younger body…Oh, they did! Lots!

The overall narrative was fast paced. The beginning was a little slower, but the real action started at about chapter seven. We follow Perry through his transformation, through combat, through injury, and through an unexpected encounter. The story progression was well thought out and paced. Scalzi has woven a thought provoking, sci-fi tale that readers, whether eighteen or eighty, can enjoy.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

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