Book Reviews

Book Review: The Christmas Mansion

The Christmas Mansion by Hollis Shiloh 3/5

Review:

A sweet, Christmas read that caters for the LGBTQ community. It is nice to read a short, contemporary romance that doesn’t rely on the ‘insta-love’ trope.

I did find the fantasy elements felt stilted and didn’t mesh into the rest of the narrative as well as they could. Everytime it was brought up that Gene was a ‘Magician’, it was like ‘oh yeah, I forgot that’, and it interrupted the flow a little.

Otherwise a cute, Christmas read.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


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Book Reviews

Book Review: The Woman Who Lost Her Face

The Woman Who Lost Her Face by NBC News 3.5/5

Review:

A shocking, true account of an horrific animal attack that left one woman with life changing injuries.

Charla Nash was attacked by her boss’s chimp, losing the majority of her facial features and hands. This short book tells of Charla before the attack, the circumstances behind her boss raising the chimp as a son, transcripts of the 911 call during the attack, and Charla’s inspirational recovery. There are pictures throughout.

It really heightens awareness for wild animals to be cared for appropriately and that they should not be pets. Wild animals can never be truly tamed.

Charla’s story is harrowing and her determination to come through it is truly inspiring.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

Find me on:

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Book Reviews, Books and Me

Review: Duplicate by Phoenix Ward

Duplicate by Phoenix Ward 3/5

Upon death, the neurological data that composes one’s personality is downloaded and installed onto computers in the next evolution of A.I.s. These programs are known as installed intelligences, or I.I.s, and they are the secret to human immortality. In recent years, the installation process has opened up for the wealthy public as a means to keep family members alive after their body has died.

Review:

The premise is intriguing and drew me in. The idea of the immortal soul is not a new concept, but mix it with science and tech and you have a fascinating story. The ethics and legal barriers to such a practice could be explored more in a longer novella or novel.

Although intriguing, I could have done with a little more explanation. Short stories don’t lend themselves well to in-depth back stories or info dumps, and that’s why I think this story would work well as a longer story.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties
All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman
K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews, Books and Me

Four in One Review: Short Stories

book-review

Bad Decisions by E.M. Smith 3.5/5

6tag_200517-064426Jamie Kendrick is known for his colossally bad decisions—jacking a squad car and turning it over in a ditch, for example. But he’s going to show everyone. With some help from his brother—and a court-ordered ankle monitor—Jamie is going to get sober, join the army, and shake his white trash reputation. And he’s actually doing a decent job until someone frames him for the grisly murders of his brother’s family.

No one believes that Jamie is innocent. No one but a mysterious blonde with a gun. She gives Jamie a choice: spend the rest of his life in prison or help her take down the man who killed his brother and set him up.

Review:

Finally, a short story that has a conclusion. Many that I’ve read lately lack a satisfactory ending in favour of getting readers to buy the next in the series, however, this story offers both conclusion and cliff hanger. Due to the length of the story, character development of both Jamie and the sub characters suffered a little, but it was a well written, fast paced read.

The Hospital (The First Mountain Man Story) by Keith .C. Blackmore 3/5

6tag_200517-064644“Mountain Man” Augustus Berry is a survivor in undead suburbia. He scavenges what he can from what’s left over. He is very careful in what he does and where he goes, taking no chances, no unnecessary risks, and weighing every choice… until he decides to visit the hospital at the edge of town, and experiences terror the likes he’s never encountered before.

Review:

If you like graphic gore and zombies, then this is the book for you. I was literally cringing in disgust and thinking ‘I’m going to have nightmares tonight’. It was a fast paced read, with a real taste of horror. The MC didn’t appeal to me in the slightest. An overweight biker who shits himself was not the imagery to help that, but he went through some stuff at the hands of Nurse Alice… urgh, hideous woman.

Teeth by Michael Robertson 2/5

6tag_200517-064844Josh is a fourteen year-old boy living in a world where the global economic recession has led to money being devalued. Three days ago, his parents went out for supplies, leaving him and his older brother, Archie, behind. They haven’t returned. A gang of looters has ransacked their house and set it on fire. The last thing their dad told them was to get to their nan’s if there was any trouble. The boys decide their current situation looks like trouble.

Setting out onto the streets of London, the boys quickly learn what a world looks like when capitalism has failed.

Review:

The only way I can describe the narrative is skittish. I was more than a little confused at times. There was violence, evidence of a sort of dystopian world after a global economic crash, and a killer who kills people and takes teeth keepsakes from the victims. The writing was fine, but the story lacking.

Fenix Rising by Jeff Liboiron 4/5

6tag_200517-063921One hundred years ago, a nuclear war decimated Earth, leaving rugged Wastelands wrought with malicious gangs and survivors desperately struggling to form new societies.

Among them, Vincent Fenix has made his temporary home in Avalon Wharf, working as a gun runner, smuggler and violence enthusiast, minding his own business.

But, when a Wasteland warlord hires a gang of ruthless cannibals to hunt down his lifelong friend, things get personal.

With fists, guns, and blades, he embarks on a path of vengeance. In true Fenix fashion, he vows to tear his city apart in search of the cannibals and when he finds them, he’s going to make them pay.

However, there is the answer to a nagging question which he ultimately seeks. Who hired them?

Review:

A dangerous, dystopian world with cannibals, gruesome murders, smuggling, and lots of guns. Well written, and more than a little gory. I found this short story a page turner, even when I was reading through my fingers. If you like Mad Max, then you’ll enjoy this book.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J.Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

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