Author Toolbox Blog Hop

Beta Feedback Implementation (Author Toolbox Blog Hop)

Beta readers are the ‘product testers’ or ‘quality control’ of the literary world. They read your unreleased work and offer feedback from a readers point of view on things such as continuity, plot holes, or even hard to pronounce character and place names.

So, what to do with all the feedback?

Getting feedback can be daunting, especially if you have a particularly conscientious beta reader who makes notes on every tiny detail they think should be changed. But that is just it, not every tiny detail should be changed.

Here’s my list of rules I follow when implementing beta feedback:

  • Wait to receive all feedback before considering changes.
  • Group common feedback points. If more than one beta reader comes back with similar feedback or suggestions, then there is a definite need to revise.
  • Separate other feedback into three groups: Implement, Discard, and Contemplate. Do this by asking yourself what feedback is important or a good idea, what is not a necessity or doesn’t aid your narrative, and then anything you want to think on.
  • For the points you want to contemplate, ask your other beta readers for their opinion. Did they notice it? Would the reading experience be better if you implement it?

The important thing to remember is that beta feedback is advice. It is up to you, as the author, whether to act on that advice. If a beta reader doesn’t like a time jump, but you feel it is important to the narrative, then leave it in.


You can check out the other #authortoolboxbloghop participants and their posts here.


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Book Reviews

3 in 1 Book Review

3 in 1 Book Review

Virtual Insanity by Charlie Dalton 2.5/5

There is a Total Recall vibe to this short story, only with zombies thrown in. I enjoy science fiction, but the dialogue grated on me. He said, she said after every bit of dialogue made it feel stilted.

Buy a Bullet by Gregg Hurwitz 3.5/5

A short story with action, intrigue, and a healthy dose of ‘vigilante out for justice’. This is a 1.5 of a series, but works as a stand alone quick read. If you are into Lee Child, it is worth checking this series out.

Death at Sunrise by Colin Conway 4/5

A whodunit that I found fully engaging. I’d be happier if this was longer. The author did weave an intriguing tale that kept me guessing.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


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100% K.J Chapman, Books and Me, Uncategorized

Book Promo Update: creative Writing Prompts for Kids

If you saw my post yesterday, you’ll know that I have a creative writing prompts book for kids available from Amazon. I have decided to offer this book for free for 5 days, so anyone who thinks it will benefit their children during self isolation or homeschooling can grab a copy at no cost.

Get your free copy here: 50 Creative Writing Prompts for Kids


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Book Promo: 50 Creative Writing Prompts for Kids by K.J. Chapman

With the current state of the world, a lot of us are now having to take on the role of teacher, and I know it can be daunting to find ways to encourage our children to learn at home. That is why I wanted to share my creative writing prompts for kids book with you. It is currently just 99p/ 99c on Amazon, and a great way to get your kids inspired to write and tell stories.

Get your copy here: 50 Creative Writing Prompts for Kids


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Author Toolbox Blog Hop

To Print or Not to Print?(Author Toolbox Blog Hop)

I am now back in my full editing swing, and I have been chatting to a writer friend about our editing processes. We got onto the conversation of printing out the draft, and this is where we differ. I don’t ever print mine out. She was shocked by this.

I’m not here to say there is a right way for any part of the writing process, I just want to share my process and why it works for me.

Why I Don’t Print My Draft

There is a very simple reason why I don’t print my drafts and that is the amount of paper used. I understand if I was traditionally published, I would be sent a whopping amount of papers during the editing process, but I have the option and chose not to.

Secondly, I have a system that works for me. The main reason for printing out your manuscript to edit is to see it in a different way. I totally agree with this. We can all make errors when we’re looking at the same thing on screen for hours on end, but for me, this works by changing the font, size, and colour. I can simply do this for every draft I need to edit and it works well for me.

I do make handwritten notes in a small notebook, but 95% off my editing is done on the screen.

Finally, and this is a ‘Mum’ reason… my kids are into everything and it wouldn’t take long for my toddler to find and misplace my work. I’m not much better because I’m not always on the ball for putting things away safely and that is a recipe for editing disaster.


Do you edit on screen or prefer to print your work? Like I said, no judgement here just our own preferred methods.


You can check out the other #authortoolboxbloghop participants and their posts here.


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Book Reviews

Book Review: Your Father’s Room by Michel Deon

Your Father’s Room by Michel Deon 3/5

A vivid recreation of the interwar period, Michel Déon’s fictionalised memoir is a touching and very true depiction of boyhood and how our early experiences affect us. 
Édouard (Michel Déon’s real name) looks back on his 1920s childhood spent in Paris and Monte Carlo. Within a bourgeois yet unconventional upbringing, ‘Teddy’, an observant and sensitive boy, must deal with not just the universal trials of growing up, but also the sudden tragedy that strikes at the heart of his family.

Review:

Michel Deon has a way for description, even if he does focus a great deal on describing overweight people. It was just something that stuck out for me, especially his fascination with Evangeline’s description.

Although, I found the look back to 1920’s Paris and Monte Carlo intriguing, I wasn’t totally enamoured with the narrative. That being said, this fictionalised memoir of Teddy is well written and the voice of Teddy does grow as he grows.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


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Book Reviews, Uncategorized

Book Review: Loyal Creatures by Morris Gleitzman

Loyal Creatures by Morris Gleitzman 5/5

Loyal Creatures is the deeply moving story of war horse Daisy and her 16-year-old owner Will, sent from the Australian outback to the gruelling Middle Eastern campaign of the First World War. Their skill in finding water is vital to their regiment in the desert, but their devotion to each other is what keeps them alive in an overwhelmingly hostile environment. Is their unwavering loyalty enough to determine their destiny?

Review:

A powerful tale about the Australian Lighthorse Brigade in World War One. Frank is just a boy when he signs up with his Dad and Daisy, his trusty horse. This is a story of friendship and loyalty between men and animals.

Although the writing style makes this an easy, quick read, I can’t believe this is a middle grade book as the ending was so gut wrenching and sob inducing for me. Loyal creatures indeed, and such a tragic end for them.

I appreciate the honesty in this story and how there really is no happy ending in war.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

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