Book Reviews

3 in 1 Book Review

The Day We Met by Various Authors 2/5

This book was made up of 4 short stories all based around that moment when love interests meet.

Story 1: Evie had a weird paparazzi phobia that felt so bizarre to me. I enjoyed the back and forth and teasing.

Story 2: Harry had a total 180° turn in his personality because the girl he liked wore a certain dress. The change jarred with me.

Story 3: The dialogue was not my cup of tea, but I like the idea of how they met as it was the moost natural of the four stories.

Story 4: My favourite of the four stories. I do love me a brooding, mysterious stranger who is up to no good.

That Night by J.S Cooper and Helen Cooper 3/5

Oo, that ending.

I enjoyed the storyline and of course, the shock ending and cliff hanger that is set up to drag you into buying the novel, but I wasn’t a fan of Xanders character. There’s a bad boy, then there’s a total, cheating jerk of a bad boy.

The Summer Sewing Bee by Alex Brown 3/5

The story was your average country village, country folk, rallying together to pull a wedding off. It was exactly what I expected, but the dialogue, and how ‘nice’ everyone was felt a little unbelievable.

And short story? 37% of the book and it was over. The rest was opening chapters from another book. Call it what it is… an excerpt.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


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Book Reviews

3 in 1 Review

Always You by Elizabeth Grey 3/5

I know this is free to encourage you to read it, and then continue onto the main series, but it just wasn’t my cup of tea. I didn’t like character. It is well written and a good introduction, just not the story for me.

We’ll Meet Again by Cathy Bramley 4/5

I didn’t realise this book contained 2 short stories. The first one was a lovely tale set around the time of the D-Day landings about an injured soldier and one of the nurses. It felt real and had the message of happiness after sadness.

The second story is about a woman finding ber place and discovering what she truly wants after divorce. It’s nice to read a women’s fiction story that is based on the woman’s strength rather than a love interest.

Just a Matter of Time by Charity Tahmaseb 4/5

Interesting concept that could easily be expanded into a something bigger. Well written and makes you think. There’s not enough hours in the day… or is someone leeching off you?


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

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Book Reviews

3 in 1 Book Review

Frugal Living: Make Your Money Go Further by Jennifer Mitchell 3/5

This book is free to purchase from Amazon Kindle. For a free book, it is a good resource for people who are brand new to frugal living. It wasn’t quite what I wanted as it didn’t tell me anything new, but newbies will benefit from this read.

Pinch Like You Mean It by Dr. Pennypincher 3/5

100 tips to save money in this free book. I found some tips I can take away, but most are for newbies to frugal living. I would recommend this book to those just starting out on their frugal living journey.

Side note: some points are tailored to American readers.

5 Ingredient Cook Book by Alissa Noel Grey 4/5

This cookbook is right up my street: 5 ingredients for meals I would actually eat, and ingredients everyday folk have to hand, and more importantly, have heard of. Nothing worse than a fancy pants recipe book. This is a cookbook that works with everyday life, kids will eat the meals, and the ingredients dont cost an arm and a leg.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

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Book Reviews

Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas 5/5

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter navigates between the poverty-stricken neighbourhood she has grown up in and the upper-crust suburban prep school she attends. Her life is up-ended when she is the sole witness to a police officer shooting her best friend, Khalil, who turns out to have been unarmed during the confrontation – but may or may not have been a drug dealer. As Starr finds herself even more torn between the two vastly different worlds she inhabits, she also has to contend with speaking her truth and, in the process, trying to stay alive herself.

Review:

I won’t start this review with a synopsis as I’m in no doubt that most people have heard about this book. The hype was huge, but well deserved.

I always feel a little overwhelmed reviewing an important book. This book is important, and the fact that it needs to exist is a saddening state of affairs for 2018+.

Angie Thomas got the balance right. One minute you’re reading something awful and horrific, then the next you’re laughing. The truth of human nature comes across in this narrative. It also helps the readers digest what they are reading. Seriously, it is needed. I’m still reeling from this book, and my own ignorance.

I read this book as a buddy read with two other reviewers. All of us have rated this read 5*. I think that says it all.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review


Content belongs to K.J.Chapman

Find me on:

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Book Reviews

Book Review: Switched by Amanda Hocking

Switched by Amanda Hocking 3/5

Wendy Everly knew she was different the day her mother tried to kill her and accused her of having been switched at birth. Although certain she’s not the monster her mother claimed she is, she does feel that she doesn’t quite fit in.

She’s bored and frustrated by her small-town life – and then there’s the secret she can’t tell anyone. Her mysterious ability – she can influence people’s decisions, without knowing how, or why . . .

When the intense and darkly handsome newcomer Finn suddenly turns up at her bedroom window one night, her world is turned upside down. He holds the key to her past, the answers to her strange powers and is the doorway to a place she never imagined could exist: Förening, the home of the Trylle.

Finally everything makes sense. Among the Trylle she is not just different, but special. But what marks her out as chosen for greatness in this world also places her in grave danger. With everything around her changing, Finn is the only person she can trust. But dark forces are conspiring – not only to separate them, but to see the downfall of everything that Wendy cares about.

The fate of Förening rests in Wendy’s hands, and the decisions she and Finn make could change all their lives forever . . .

Review:

I had read Hocking’s Hollowland, but none of the Trylle series. The reviews I had seen were extremely mixed, but I like to judge for myself. I’m sat firmly in the middle ground with 3/5 stars. I liked this read, but did not love it. Hollowland was much more my cup of tea.

I’m not a reader who dislikes a well placed genre trope if done well. This book is full of tropes; some work, some felt outdated. The latter made Wendy seem a little ‘damsel in distressy’ for my taste. Stand up for yourself a little more, girl.

I did like the troll/ changeling concept, and the dynamics between the various characters. I want to know more about the Trylle and their lifestyle/ history, so I will be continuing on with this series. Plus, a friend told me to plough through book one as book two is much more satisfying.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews

Book Review: How to be Champion by Sarah Millican

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How to be Champion by Sarah Millican 3/5

Part autobiography, part self help, part confession, part celebration of being a common-or-garden woman, part collection of synonyms for nunny, Sarah Millican’s debut book delves into her super normal life with daft stories, funny tales and proper advice on how to get past life’s blips – like being good at school but not good at friends, the excitement of IBS and how to blossom post divorce.

If you’ve ever worn glasses at the age of six, worn an off-the-shoulder gown with no confidence, been contacted by an old school bully, lived in your childhood bedroom in your thirties, been gloriously dumped in a Frankie and Benny’s, cried so much you felt great, been for a romantic walk with a dog, worn leggings two days in a row even though they smelt of wee from a distance, then this is YOUR BOOK. If you haven’t done those things but wish you had, THIS IS YOUR BOOK. If you just want to laugh on a train/sofa/toilet or under your desk at work, THIS IS YOUR BOOK.

Review:

This book reads as part autobiography, part self help book. Sarah Millican came to the world of stand-up a little later in her life. She recounts her childhood on the breadline, loneliness and bullying at school, her various jobs, her divorce and subsequent depression, and meeting her now husband, Gary. The story of how she got into stand-up is woven in between her personal life narrative.

Sarah’s humour transfers onto the page, and this appears to help her reflect on the more serious issues (such as the bullying) with her infamous humour. It may be a coping mechanism, but it is definitely rallies the victims and de-sensationalises the bullies. Thumbs up!

That being said, I found the book didn’t read with a true sense of fluidity. There are many footnotes telling the reader to see a later chapter, or to wait for more on a subject until later in the book.

If you like blunt, no nonsense autobiographies, then try this read. If you don’t like a potty-mouthed comedian… maybe not. I do like the raw, honest recount that Sarah gives. I even read the book with her accent in my head.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review

Book Reviews

Book Review: Ten Days in a Mad-House by Nellie Bly

Ten Days in a Mad-House by Nellie Bly 4/5

Ten Days in A Mad-House, Was Written By Nellie Bly in 1887, after she lived, undercover, at a women’s insane asylum at Blackwell’s Island in 1887 for ten days. This was an assignment given to her by Joseph Pulitzer. The living conditions and treatment of the Patients were Horrible.

Review:

Although the story of Nellie Bly going undercover in an asylum is truth, it reads as fiction. The horrific treatment of patients is the stuff out of a nightmare: making all the women use the same towel, rotten food, staff choking patients for being noisy etc. The list of atrocious behaviour by those in a position of care is endless.

It was also shocking to read how quickly sane women were deemed insane for quite different illnesses.

Taking a look inside an asylum in 1887 is eye opening. Nellie was incredibly brave to put herself through that ordeal for ten days. It makes you think about the poor souls left behind in similar institutes.


The opinions expressed here are those of K.J. Chapman and no other parties

All books reviewed on this blog have been read by K.J.Chapman

K.J.Chapman has not been paid for this review